Topical Treatment of Pruritic Skin Disease and the Role of Community Pharmacists.

[Topical Treatment of Pruritic Skin Disease and the Role of Community Pharmacists]. Yakugaku Zasshi. 2019;139(12):1563-1567 Authors: Yamaura K Abstract Itching, or pruritus, can be defined as an unpleasant sensation that evokes the desire to scratch. Pruritus is most commonly associated with a primary skin disorder such as atopic dermatitis (AD), psoriasis, etc., and can have a major impact on the quality of life of those patients. Itch-induced scratching can further damage the skin barrier, leading to a worsening of symptoms. For that reason, it is important to manage pruritus. Topical glucocorticoids are commonly the first-line therapy in the management of AD and psoriasis patients. We found that topical glucocorticoids induce pruritus in mice under certain conditions. Topical glucocorticoids may induce pruritus in a mouse model of allergic contact dermatitis via inhibition of prostaglandin (PG)D2 production in antigen-mediated activated mast cells in the skin. Additionally, topical glucocorticoids do not induce pruritus in healthy skin. These results indicate the importance of controlling skin inflammation to a healthy level by applying sufficient quantities of glucocorticoids to avoid glucocorticoid-induced pruritus. However, topical "steroid phobia" is common in Japan, and most patients apply inadequate amounts of topical glucocorticoids for this reason. This may cause glucocorticoid-induced pruritus in patients by prolonging the skin infl...
Source: Yakugaku Zasshi : Journal of the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Yakugaku Zasshi Source Type: research

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This study aims to investigate the possible relationship between ER activation and development of imiquimod ‐induced psoriasis‐like dermatitis. A mouse model of imiquimod‐induced psoriasis‐like dermatitis was generated by 5 days of topical application of 5% of imiquimod cream on the back of the ear and the shaved back skin of male BALB/c mice. From the second day of applying 5% imiquimod cream, ei ther ERα selective agonist (propylpyrazoletriol [PPT] 2.5 mg/kg) or ERβ selective agonist (diarylpropionitrile, DPN; 2.5 mg/kg) was administered orally for four consecutive days. Immediately after the final imi...
Source: Journal of Applied Toxicology - Category: Toxicology Authors: Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
Self-report measures are needed to better understand the relationships among sleep, itching, scratching, and chronic itch conditions and their associations with disease severity, quality of life, health, and functioning. Two scales related to sleep and/or scratch were recently developed and assessed in 137 patients with chronic itch and atopic dermatitis or psoriasis. The Scratch Intensity and Impact Scale consisted of two factors (Scratching Intensity and Impact of Scratching on Quality of Life) that accounted for 64.59% of the variance with a total of 13 items, an overall Cronbach ’s alphas of 0.93, and test-retest...
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Authors: Kaaz K, Szepietowski JC, Matusiak Ł Abstract Chronic dermatoses, including atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, prurigo nodularis, chronic spontaneous urticaria and hidradenitis suppurativa, as well as accompanying subjective symptoms (itch and pain), have a great impact on patients' well-being. Skin plays an important role in the physiological sleep process. This review attempts to analyze the association between chronic dermatoses in adults and sleep quality in recent studies. Polysomnography and actigraphy are performed for the objective assessment of sleep quality. Questionnaire-based subjective evaluations ...
Source: Advances in Dermatology and Allergology - Category: Dermatology Tags: Postepy Dermatol Alergol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: We found lack of evidence to address our review question: for most of our interventions of interest, we found no eligible studies. The neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist serlopitant was the only intervention that we could assess. One study provided low-certainty evidence suggesting that serlopitant may reduce pruritus intensity when compared with placebo. We are uncertain of the effects of serlopitant on other outcomes, as certainty of the evidence is very low. More studies with larger sample sizes, focused on patients with CPUO, are needed. Healthcare professionals, patients, and other stakeholders may h...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: We identified important similarities and differences in the clinical characteristics of adults with psoriasis and AD; these should help clinicians to prioritize and improve patient management. PMID: 31630393 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The British Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Br J Dermatol Source Type: research
In this study, we investigated the relation between TRPV3 and warmth-evoked itch in AD. Here, we found a marked upregulation of TRPV3 in AD-lesional skin compared with healthy skin or lesional skin of psoriasis or allergic contact dermatitis.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Epidermal Structure and Function Source Type: research
Pruritus, or itch, is an uncomfortable sensation that elicits a desire to scratch. Several dermatologic disorders such as atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis cause chronic pruritus that may greatly reduce the quality of life of those affected. Since scratching damages the skin barrier of the affected area and exacerbates the symptoms, mitigation of pruritus is extremely important for the treatment of these diseases. However, this type of chronic pruritus is generally resistant to antihistamines, the most widely used antipruritic drugs.
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
Discussion Atopic dermatitis (AD) has a prevalence of 3-5% in the overall U.S. population but is increasing with an estimated 10-15% lifetime risk in childhood. It is even more common in children of color with a prevalence in African-American/black children of 17% and Hispanic children of 14%. Health care utilization data also appears to support more severe disease in children of color also. Atopic dermatitis or eczema is a common dermatological skin problem which characteristically is a pruritic, papular eruption with erythema. Like most papulosquamous eruptions it often occurs in intertrigenous areas in people with alle...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Pruritus in autoimmune and inflammatory dermatoses is a common symptom that can be severe and affect the quality of life of patients. In some diseases, itch is related to disorders activity and severity or may occur independent of the disease. Despite the high prevalence, the symptom is still underrated and there are only a few trials investigating the efficacy of drugs for disease-specific pruritus. In this review, the characteristics and possible pathomechanisms of pruritus in various dermatoses like bullous autoimmune diseases, connective tissue diseases as well as autoimmune-associated dermatoses (atopic dermatitis, ps...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), a membrane protein ion channel, is known to mediate itch and pain in skin. The function of TRPA1, however, in psoriasiform dermatitis (PsD) is uncertain. Herein, we found that expression of TRPA1 is highly up-regulated in human psoriatic lesional skin. To study the role of TRPA1 in PsD, we assessed Psoriasis Severity Index (PSI) scores, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin thickness and pathology, and examined dermal inflammatory infiltrates, Th17-related genes and itch-related genes in c57BL/6 as wild-type (WT) and TRPA1 gene knockout (KO) mice following ...
Source: J Cell Mol Med - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: J Cell Mol Med Source Type: research
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