Jumonji domain-containing protein 6 functions as a marker of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma at advanced stage with no effect on prognosis.

Jumonji domain-containing protein 6 functions as a marker of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma at advanced stage with no effect on prognosis. Oncol Lett. 2019 Dec;18(6):5843-5852 Authors: Guo B, Wang L, Qin X, Shen Y, Ma C Abstract A number of studies have reported the upregulation and functional roles of Jumonji domain-containing protein 6 (JMJD6) in various types of cancer. However, little is known regarding the clinical significance of JMJD6 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), particularly in terms of large-cohort data. In the present study, bioinformatics analysis was performed, using the University of California Santa Cruz Xena Browser and the Gene Expression Profiling Interactive Analysis 2 server, based on the Cancer Genome Atlas HNSCC cohort. In addition, a validation cohort was constructed based on 98 HNSCC cases. JMJD6 overexpression and knockdown, colony-formation, Transwell and cell viability assays were performed. JMJD6 was highly expressed in HNSCC samples and was associated with advanced pathological stage. However, no significant association was observed between JMJD6 expression levels and overall survival or disease-free survival times of patients with HNSCC. Subsequent in vitro assays indicated that overexpression of JMJD6 promoted malignant progression of HNSCC, by regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Nevertheless, JMJD6 overexpression had no significant effects on the viability of HNSCC cells treated with 5-f...
Source: Oncology Letters - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncol Lett Source Type: research

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Discussion MDSCs violently emerge in pathological conditions in an attempt to limit potentially harmful immune and inflammatory responses. Mechanisms supporting their expansion and survival are deeply investigated in cancer, in the perspective to reactivate specific antitumor responses and prevent their contribution to disease evolution. These findings will likely contribute to improve the targeting of MDSCs in anticancer immunotherapies, either alone or in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors. New evidence indicates that the expansion of myeloid cell differentiation in pathology is subject to fine-tuning, as its...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In this study, to improve our understanding of the role of ATP1A1 in the malignant phenotype and pathogenesis of GSCs, we evaluated ATP1A1 expression in GBMs of different grades and in two primary GSC lines established from human GBM tissues. We evaluated the role of ATP1A1 in GSC growth, its interactions with Src, and the activation of the ERK1/2 and AKT pathways. Our results revealed that ATP1A1 acts as an oncogene in our GSC models and targeting ATP1A1/Src may suppress GSC proliferation and growth. Materials and Methods Cell Isolation and Culture Human brain GBM tissues were from pathologically confirmed surgical spe...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions: In OSCC, very low preoperative NLR values have a negative prognostic impact on survival and recurrence, similarly to high ratios. ENE and perineural spread are the most important clinical-pathologic prognosticators. Introduction Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) accounts for more than 95% of oral tumors and is the eighth most frequent cancer worldwide, with an estimated incidence of 640,000 new cases per year (1). Survival of OSCC has slightly improved over the last 30 years, probably as a consequence of multimodal treatment spreading. However, intensified therapeutic regimens can result in signific...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions: This meta-analysis demonstrated that CD44 overexpression might be an unfavorable prognostic factor for CRC patients and could be used to predict poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis. Introduction Although therapies for colorectal cancer (CRC) has improved in recent years, colorectal cancer is still the third most common cause of cancer related death worldwide (1). Metastasis are observed in 25% of patients at initial diagnosis and approximately 50% of patients will develop metastasis (2). Presently, the outcome prediction and the therapy schedule determination of CRC patie...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Reena Goswami1, Gayatri Subramanian2, Liliya Silayeva1, Isabelle Newkirk1, Deborah Doctor1, Karan Chawla2, Saurabh Chattopadhyay2, Dhyan Chandra3, Nageswararao Chilukuri1 and Venkaiah Betapudi1,4* 1Neuroscience Branch, Research Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen, MD, United States 2Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH, United States 3Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY, United States 4Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University, Clev...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Laia Gorchs1*, Carlos Fernández Moro1,2, Peter Bankhead3, Katharina P. Kern1, Imrul Sadeak1, Qingda Meng1, Elena Rangelova4,5 and Helen Kaipe1,6* 1Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden 2Department of Pathology/Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden 3Division of Pathology, Centre for Genomic &Experimental Medicine, Western General Hospital, Institute of Genetics &Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom 4Department of CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden 5Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Center for Digesti...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions MDSC are major players in the immunosuppressive scenario in cancer, thanks to their phenotype heterogeneity and critical interaction with several innate immune cells, thus representing a crucial target in oncology. Here we reviewed the interactions of MDSCs with NK cells. The contribution of key cytokines, chemokines and mediators active in this process have been discussed. We also described the contribution of MDSC on angiogenesis directly or indirectly through interactions with NK and immunosuppressive activities. A parallel of the cancer associated to the decidual counterpart of these cells is discussed, a...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Joe Abdo1, Christopher S. Wichman2, Nicholas E. Dietz1,3, Pawel Ciborowski4, John Fleegel1, Sumeet K. Mittal1,5 and Devendra K. Agrawal1* 1Department of Clinical and Translational Science, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE, United States 2Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, United States 3Department of Pathology, CHI Health Creighton University Medical Center, College of Medicine, Omaha, NE, United States 4Department of Pharmacology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, United States 5Norton Thoracic Institute, St....
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Hepatoma-Derived Growth Factor and DDX5 Promote Carcinogenesis and Progression of Endometrial Cancer by Activating β-Catenin Chunhua Liu1†, Lijing Wang1†, Qingping Jiang2†, Junyi Zhang3†, Litong Zhu1, Li Lin1, Huiping Jiang1, Dan Lin1, Yanyi Xiao1, Weiyi Fang1,3 and Suiqun Guo1* 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China 2Department of Pathology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China 3Integrated Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guang...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Together, our results strongly suggest a novel role of c-Fos as a regulator of EMT and cancer stem cell reprogramming in HNSCC cells, which may hold potential as a CSC-directed therapeutic approach to improve HNSCC treatment. PMID: 27965308 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Cancer Res Source Type: research
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