Meniscus Repair Does not Result in an Inferior Short-term Outcome Compared with Meniscus Resection. An Analysis of 5,378 Patients with Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

To compare the preoperative and 1- and 2-year postoperative Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscale scores between isolated anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) and ACLR with additional medial meniscus (MM) and/or lateral meniscus (LM) resection or repair.
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research

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ConclusionThe progression of post-traumatic chondral damage may occur at a faster rate in patients who require ACL reconstruction and meniscal repair than in patients with intact menisci.
Source: Asia-Pacific Journal of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation and Technology - Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2019Source: Arthroscopy Techniques, Volume 8, Issue 12Author(s): Alberto Gobbi, Katarzyna Herman, Radosław Grabowski, Dawid SzwedowskiAbstractIt is well known that the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the main stabilizer to the anterior tibial translation in the knee. The current gold standard of treatment for such lesions is ACL reconstruction. However, there are notable disadvantages to ACL reconstruction that include loss of proprioception, donor site morbidity, incomplete return to high-demand sports, and the inability to restore normal kinematics of the knee joint. Additionally, in adole...
Source: Arthroscopy Techniques - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
To compare the preoperative and 1- and 2-year postoperative Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscale scores between isolated anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) and ACLR with additional medial meniscus (MM) and/or lateral meniscus (LM) resection or repair.
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
ConclusionMore than 60% of the patients reported an acceptable symptom state on four of the five KOOS subscales 2  years after primary ACLR. Age ≥ 30 years and female gender were the non-modifiable factors that consistently increased and reduced, respectively, the odds of achieving a PASS. A symmetrical 6-month isokinetic quadriceps strength and single-leg-hop test performance were the modifiable factor s that consistently increased the opportunity of achieving a PASS 2 years after primary ACLR.Level of evidenceIII.
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeAlthough reference values in healthy subjects have been published for both the International Knee Documentation Committee 2000 subjective knee form (IKDC 2000) and the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), data obtained during the first year after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) are sparse. The aim was to establish patient reference values for both questionnaires at different time points and depending on nine individual patient characteristics during the first year after ACL-R.MethodsProspectively recorded data from a hospital-based registry were retrospectively extracted fro...
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeThe aim of this review was to compare the clinical outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) with either meniscal repair or meniscectomy for concomitant meniscal injury. The primary hypothesis was that short-term clinical outcomes ( ≤ 2-year follow-up) for ACLR concomitant with either meniscal repair or resection would be similar. The secondary hypothesis was that ACLR with meniscal repair would result in better longer term outcomes compared with meniscal resection.MethodsThe authors searched two online databases (EMBASE and MEDLINE) from inception until March 2018 for the litera...
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
The prevalence of osteoarthritis following failed meniscal repair has been shown to be significantly increased when compared to successful repair. The aim of this study was to determine whether the addition of anterolateral ligament reconstruction (ALLR) and consequent improved rotational knee stability confers a protective effect on medial meniscal repairs performed at the time of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR).
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 July 2018Source: Arthroscopy TechniquesAuthor(s): Colin M. Robbins, Colin P. Murphy, Blake T. Daney, Anthony Sanchez, Matthew T. ProvencherAbstractIn recent years there has been increased attention on preserving the menisci because they perform vital roles in maintaining knee joint homeostasis. The anterolateral (AL) meniscal root is particularly vulnerable during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. When the AL root is iatrogenically injured, it is imperative that it is repaired in a timely fashion to prevent early-onset osteoarthritis. In this article we outline our knotless su...
Source: Arthroscopy Techniques - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionMeniscus resection in addition to ACL reconstruction resulted in worse clinical outcomes than isolated ACL reconstruction patients; a result not seen within the meniscus repair group. This suggests that, when possible, meniscus repair may provide greater clinical outcomes over resection when treating a reparable meniscal tear that presents along with an ACL tear. Clinicians should consider and implement these findings for the management of future meniscus tear patients within their clinical practice.Level of evidenceLevel III.
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
J Knee Surg DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1655765The purpose of this study was to assess intra-articular use of a nonabsorbable braided suture tape for its biocompatibility when implanted adjacent to the native anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in a canine model. Establishing biocompatibility of suture tape in the knee is an important foundational step for clinicians considering use of suture tape augmentation for ACL reconstruction or repair. The study hypothesis was that a nonabsorbable braided suture tape would be biocompatible in the knee with no resultant adverse functional consequences, and no significant intra-articular synovi...
Source: Journal of Knee Surgery - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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