Traversing the Gut-Brain Axis: Translation to Addiction Medicine

Director's Seminar Series Alcohol and substance use disorders represent the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. There is a crucial need to develop novel effective treatments for patients struggling with addiction. Dr. Leggio's laboratory conducts preclinical and human studies to identify possible novel medications for addiction. His group uses a combination of state of the art, innovative bio behavioral, neuroimaging and pharmacological procedures performed under well-controlled human laboratory conditions. Collaborative bed-to-bench approaches are also employed using behavioral, pharmacological, and transgenic animal models. Initial work focused on the role of medications targeting the GABA-B receptor and the alpha-1 receptor in the treatment of patients with alcohol use disorder, including those with medical comorbidities such as alcohol-associated liver disease and hypertension. Subsequent work has focused on the interplay between addictive behaviors and pathways related to the microbiome-gut-liver-brain axis and to appetitive- and stress-related neuroendocrine systems. Among other lines of research, his laboratory is currently investigating the potential role of neuroendocrine pathways, such as ghrelin and other gut-related peptides, as possible new neuropharmacological targets for the treatment of alcohol and substance use disorders.Air date: 12/6/2019 12:00:00 PM
Source: Videocast - All Events - Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

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Drinking alcohol causes damage to your health in both the short term and long term, even for moderate drinkers. For individuals who suffer from addiction to alcohol and frequently drink in excess, these risks become higher. Knowing the risks of drinking alcohol is important to help avoid drinking to excess and reduce the likelihood of these risks. Short-Term Risks of Drinking Alcohol There are many short-term risks that occur when drinking alcohol. These risks can happen to anyone, including individuals suffering from alcohol use disorder, or individuals who are drinking for the very first time. Injuries When you drink al...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol dependency alcohol detox alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcohol treatment facility alcohol use risks Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Natural recovery after TBI may include delayed onset of functional decline or early recovery, followed by progressive deterioration, and is negatively affected by medical comorbidities. Results contribute to the growing evidence that TBI is most appropriately treated as a chronic medical condition complicated by a variety of comorbid conditions.
Source: The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation - Category: Neurology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Alcohol is embedded in our society, and it is difficult to be in a public space without seeing a reference to alcohol or being offered a drink. Alcohol is broken down in the liver by an enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase. People with a variant in this enzyme have issues with metabolizing alcohol and can develop total body flushing or reddening of the skin. Alcohol consumption has been associated with pregnancy defects, liver disease, pancreatitis, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, stroke, cancer, addiction issues, and physical injury (trauma to self/others with acute intoxication). The health benefits of alcoh...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alcohol Headache Health Source Type: blogs
When it comes to your beverage of choice, alcoholic beverages are unique. For millions, they are a regular part of the dining experience. They’re often an important component of social events, celebrations, and milestones; we toast people, events, and memories with alcohol. They play a key role in many religious traditions. And, of course, the alcoholic beverage industry is a major economic force, responsible for more than $220 billion in sales annually in the US. And all of this is true despite the well-known and well-publicized risks of drinking too much alcohol. The negative effects of alcohol It should be a surpr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alcohol Health Source Type: blogs
Hot on the heels of headlines linking alcohol consumption with longer life comes new research that casts a much more sobering light on drinking. According to an analysis of more than 1 million people—the largest study of its kind to date—scientists say that heavy alcohol use is the biggest modifiable risk factor for dementia, especially early-onset forms of the disease. The findings, which are published in The Lancet Public Health, came as a shock to the researchers involved. “We hypothesized that alcohol would play some role, but I don’t think anyone expected the size of the effect to be so large,&...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news
This report contains new and follow-up metric data relating to the eight main recommendations of the Lancet Standing Commission on Liver Disease in the UK, which aim to reduce the unacceptable harmful consequences of excess alcohol consumption, obesity, and viral hepatitis. For alcohol, we provide data on alcohol dependence, damage to families, and the documented increase in alcohol consumption since removal of the above-inflation alcohol duty escalator. Alcoholic liver disease will shortly overtake ischaemic heart disease with regard to years of working life lost. The rising prevalence of overweight and obesity, affecting...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract Based on the knowledge that alcohol misuse causes a multitude of diseases and increased mortality, this systematic review examines whether a reduction of the individual alcohol consumption can contribute to a minimization of health risks within a harm reduction approach. In fact, the reviewed 63 studies indicate that interventions aiming at alcohol reduction (including total abstinence as one possible therapeutic aim) indeed resulted in or were associated with positive effects in harmful, hazardous or alcohol‐dependent drinkers. Major benefits were observed for reducing alcohol‐associated injuries, recovery of...
Source: Addiction Biology - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Abstract Based on the knowledge that alcohol misuse causes a multitude of diseases and increased mortality, this systematic review examines whether a reduction of the individual alcohol consumption can contribute to a minimization of health risks within a harm reduction approach. In fact, the reviewed 63 studies indicate that interventions aiming at alcohol reduction (including total abstinence as one possible therapeutic aim) indeed resulted in or were associated with positive effects in harmful, hazardous or alcohol‐dependent drinkers. Major benefits were observed for reducing alcohol‐associated injuries, recovery of...
Source: Addiction Biology - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
You can make significant strides in overcoming codependency by developing new attitudes, skills, and behavior. But deeper recovery may involve healing trauma that usually began in childhood. Trauma can be emotional, physical, or environmental, and can range from emotional neglect to experiencing a fire. Childhood events had a greater impact on you then than they would today because you didn’t have coping skills that an adult would have. As a consequence of growing up in a dysfunctional family environment, codependents often suffer further trauma due to relationships with other people who may be abandoning, abusive, a...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Abuse Caregivers Children and Teens Disorders Domestic Violence Family General Parenting Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Treatment ACE Avoidance Child Abuse Codependency Codependent Relationship Depersonalization Dysfunct Source Type: news
Last July, Harvard Medical School and its Cambridge Health Alliance accepted $3.3 million from the Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility to create an endowed chair in behavioral sciences research at Harvard Medical School and the Cambridge Health Alliance. The Dean of the Harvard Medical School proudly announced the acceptance of this money and praised the Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility, while acknowledging a long-standing alliance between the two entities: "The Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility has long been a strong supporter of the research program at Cambridge Health Allian...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs
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