Three evidence-based ways to develop a resilient mind

___ Life throws chaos at us on a regular basis—whether it’s our finances, our relationships, or our health. In the work world, around 50 percent of people are burned out in industries like health care, banking, and nonprofits, and employers spend $300 billion per year on workplace-related stress. In response, we just keep on pushing through, surviving on adrenaline. We overschedule ourselves; we drink another coffee; we respond to one more email. If we stay amped up all the time, we think, we’ll eventually be able to get things done. But all that does is burn us out, drain our productivity, and lead to exhaustion. There’s another way—a calmer way. Cultivating a more restful, relaxed state of mind doesn’t mean we’ll drown under all our responsibilities. Instead, research suggests it will bring us greater attention, energy, and creativity to tackle them. And science also points to simple ways we can tap into that calm state of mind to be more resilient in our chaotic lives. Stress was never meant to be a 24/7 experience. As Stanford professor Robert Sapolsky explains, you’re really only supposed to feel stressed in the five minutes right before you die. When you are being chased in the savanna by a wild animal, your stress response is supposed to save your life—it mobilizes your attention, muscles, and immune system to get you quickly out of danger. When animals escape, they come right out of fight-or-flight mode and into &l...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness adrenaline Breathing coffee creativity Decision-making exhaustion Mindfulness-Training productivity relaxed state-of-mind Stress Stress Response workplace Source Type: blogs

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Source: Journal of Adolescence - Category: Child Development Source Type: research
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Source: Postgraduate Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Postgrad Med Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: J Reprod Infant Psychol Source Type: research
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Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
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