High-risk human papillomavirus testing as a primary screening for cervical cancer: position statement by the Korean Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology.

High-risk human papillomavirus testing as a primary screening for cervical cancer: position statement by the Korean Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology. J Gynecol Oncol. 2019 Nov 08;: Authors: Kong TW, Kim M, Kim YH, Kim YB, Kim J, Kim JW, Park MH, Park JH, Rhee JH, Lim MC, Hong JS Abstract Based on emerging data and current knowledge regarding high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) testing as a primary screening for cervical cancer, the Korean Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology support the following scientific facts: • Compared to cytology, hrHPV screening has higher sensitivity and detects more cases of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. • Qualified hrHPV testing can be considered as an alternative primary screening for cervical cancer to the current cytology method. • The starting age of primary hrHPV screening should not be before 25 years because of possible overtreatment in this age, which has a high human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence but rarely progresses to cancer. The screening interval should be no sooner than every 3 years and no longer than every 5 years. • Before the introduction of hrHPV screening in Korea, research into comparative effectiveness of primary hrHPV screening for cervical cancer should be conducted to determine the appropriate HPV assay, starting age, and screening interval. PMID: 31789003 [Pub...
Source: Journal of Gynecologic Oncology - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Gynecol Oncol Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS: Clinical follow-up strategies for women with CIN1 or normal cervix could be adjusted accordingly based on hrHPV/cytology status. PMID: 31937451 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Gynecologic Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Gynecol Oncol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The screening for HPV DNA testing during follow-up facilitates early detection of recurrence after radiotherapy. PMID: 31912676 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Gynecologic Oncology - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Gynecol Oncol Source Type: research
The rise of vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as measles and hepatitis, in the United States and around the globe has been alarming in recent years. For women — especially those hoping to become pregnant, as well as women who are pregnant or have recently had a baby — vaccines can be a worrisome topic. There are many misconceptions about vaccine safety in and around pregnancy that can lead to confusion and unnecessary fear of a lifesaving medical tool. As a practicing ob/gyn, I often discuss vaccines with my patients and help them sort out fears versus facts. Which vaccines should you consider before concepti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Parenting Pregnancy Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: The nanowire assay demonstrated excellent ability to identify HPV DNA from urine specimens. We observed an excellent agreement in the detection of high-risk HPV between paired urine and cervical samples, even with small urine sample volume. PMID: 31926639 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Gynecologic Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Gynecol Oncol Source Type: research
Purpose of review Although cervical cancer continues to decrease in incidence throughout the developed world because of rigorous screening and vaccination campaigns, the disease remains a major cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality in resource-limited regions including sub-Saharan Africa. This review summarizes current efforts to implement cost-effective and widespread cervical cancer education, screening, and community-based interventions in Africa and the challenges faced by local healthcare workers. Recent findings Effective screening with cytology (with or without high-risk human papillomavirus [HPV] DNA...
Source: Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: GYNECOLOGIC CANCER: Edited by Gottfried E. Konecny Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Cervical cancer can be detected by molecular techniques such as (1) PCR, (2) visual acetic acid method, (3) DNA Hybrid II test, (4) liquid based cytology, (5) Pap-Smear techniques, and (6) colposcopy techniques. Early detection of CC is very much in need; Cryotherapy or LEEP (Loop electro surgical excision procedure) can be conducted during the first and second stages of CC. Some metabolic changes in the human body such as fluctuating levels of insulin and triglycerides and increased activity of adiponectin may lead to CC. These contributing factors, such as adipokines, can be used as bio-markers for the CC det...
Source: Current Drug Metabolism - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Drug Metab Source Type: research
DiscussionIf mailed self-collection of samples for HPV testing is an effective strategy for increasing cervical cancer screening among women overdue for screening, this method has the potential to reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality in medically underserved women at higher risk of developing cervical cancer.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.govNCT02651883, Registered on 11 January 2016.
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
CONCLUSION: C. trachomatis infection was not significantly associated HR-HPV and abnormal cytology. This study confirms the increasing rate of C. trachomatis infection in asymptomatic women so routine screening for these infections has been suggested to (a) prevent complications such as the chronic pelvic pain associated with prolong infection and (b) reduce sexual transmission of the infection. PMID: 31870131 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Asian Pac J Cancer Prev Source Type: research
Conclusion: It was determined that the knowledge level and attitudes of the participant women about HPV, cervical cancer, and Pap smear test were insufficient.
Source: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
The Alinity m HR HPV assay (Alinity) is a novel human papillomavirus (HPV) assay that individually identifies genotypes HPV16, HPV18, and HPV45 while reporting on 11 other high-risk HPV (hrHPV) genotypes in two aggregates: HPV31/33/52/58 and HPV35/39/51/56/59/66/68. The clinical performance of Alinity for screening for cervical cancer was evaluated in population-based settings. For women aged ≥30 years, the clinical sensitivity (n = 68) and specificity (n = 3,077) for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ (CIN2+) of Alinity were 100.0% and 92.4%, respectively, and were not inferior to those of the...
Source: Journal of Clinical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Virology Source Type: research
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