Insurance Coverage Parity for Mental Health Concerns Is Getting Worse

As a testament to the ineffectiveness of laws when not rigorously enforced (hello, speed limit, I’m looking at you!), the lack of enforcement on mental health parity has been devastating. Mental health parity means that insurance companies are required, by law, to offer the same coverage and benefits for mental disorders as they do for physical conditions. When an American seeks treatment for a mental health or substance abuse problem, chances are they are going to face some pretty steep hurdles. And those hurdles are only getting worse before they get better, according to a new study examining insurance claim data from 2016-2017. The new study was funded by the Bowman Family Foundation and published by Milliman. It looked at the insurance claims data — the paperwork providers file with an insurance company in order to get paid. The research shares some disappointing data, including this bombshell: “In 2017, out-of-network use for behavioral health was 520% more likely than for medical/surgical, up from 280% in 2013.” What that means is that nearly twice as many Americans are turning to mental health professionals outside of their insurance’s network of covered providers in 2017 than in 2013. Why is that? Likely because insurance companies notoriously compile and maintain out-of-date, ghost provider databases of mental health professionals that supposedly are accepting new clients — but aren’t. These ghost directories (or ghost netwo...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Policy and Advocacy Psychotherapy Treatment mental health equality Mental Health Parity parity act treatment in America Source Type: blogs

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CONCLUSIONS: The studies showed a high degree of heterogeneity for types of comparisons, outcome measures and small samples. Descriptions of treatment modalities are required. On one outcome of arrest (no parole violations), we identified a significant reduction when cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) was compared to a therapeutic community programme. But for all other outcomes, none of the interventions were effective. Larger trials are required to increase the precision of confidence about the certainty of evidence. PMID: 31834635 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: This review represents one from a family of three reviews focusing on interventions for drug-using offenders. Many people under the care of the criminal justice system have co-occurring mental health problems and drug misuse problems; it is important to identify the most effective treatments for this vulnerable population. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of interventions for drug-using offenders with co-occurring mental health problems in reducing criminal activity or drug use, or both.This review addresses the following questions.• Does any treatment for drug-using offenders...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Whether you believe you’re addicted to cannabis, or severely dependent on it, if you’re trying to reduce consumption and have been unable to do so with behavioral therapy alone, there may be some hopeful news. Researchers at the University of Sydney have found promising results from their study of a cannabinoid agonist medication that targets brain receptors in reducing cannabis relapse rates. The study, which was published in the JAMA Internal Medicine noted that cannabis is the most widely-used psychoactive substance worldwide, with some 10% of Australians saying they’ve consumed it in the last year. Ab...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Interview Medications Substance Abuse cannabis Marijuana Nabiximols THC Source Type: news
Lying is, for better or worse, a behavior humans take part in at some point in their lives. On average, Americans tell one to two lies a day, multiple studies have suggested. But it’s where some people are fibbing that might come as a surprise. It turns out, one person often on the receiving end of a lie is someone people are supposed to open up to the most — their therapist. “I’ve totally lied in therapy. Sometimes, I’m even too ashamed or embarrassed to admit to the crazy outrageous things I’ve done,” says Laura, 28, who requested to only use her first name for fear of losing her...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized behavioral psychology brain science Human Nature lying mental health Therapy Source Type: news
Addiction is a chronic condition that leads to overdose and death. Addiction ruins lives, families and devastates communities. If you are suffering from addiction, it can be normal to ask yourself hard questions such as, “will I suffer from addiction forever? Is there a cure for addiction?” While there is no magic wand that can cure addiction, it is a treatable condition. When addiction is treated, people can go on to live normal, happy, healthy lives. While addiction may cause a lot of destruction and fractured relationships in its path, people can repair and move on from them as well. The Cure for Addiction:...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Complementary Therapies Comprehensive behavioral treatment Healthy Eating and Recovery Mental Health Sober Living and Aftercare Substance Abuse addicted to alcohol addiction help addiction recovery programs Source Type: blogs
This study aimed to investigate a potential correlation between NGF serum levels and brain structural differences in schizophrenia. Furthermore, a potential overlap between the results of a whole brain correlation analysis between GMV and NGF serum levels and the results of GMV reductions in schizophrenia patients were identified in a conjunction analysis.Materials and MethodsSubjectsEighteen schizophrenia patients from the Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany, and 19 gender- and age-matched healthy controls from the general population participated in ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions: CBT, psychosocial intervention, supportive counseling, psychodynamic psychotherapy, and other psychological interventions can be recommended for clinical practice. More studies are needed, especially for non-CBT interventions and for all psychotherapies on negative symptoms.IntroductionSchizophrenia affects approximately 1% of the population, usually starting in adolescence or young adulthood, frequently leading to persistent disability, with a high risk of suicide (8%). Despite the advance in antipsychotics treatment, approximately 30% of patients with schizophrenia show a poor response or no response to anti...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusion Currently available pharmacotherapies for PTSD are poorly effective on a substantial proportion of patients. Given this high rate of pharmacological unresponsiveness, further studies are needed to extend the knowledge of the basic mechanisms associated with the pathophysiology of this disorder. The findings discussed in this review suggest that DAergic dysfunction, especially genetic-dependent DAergic alteration, plays a prominent role in the pathophysiology of PTSD; as a consequence, drugs targeting the DAergic system might be therapeutically relevant. A better understanding of how and which DAergic dysfunctio...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Conclusions: The primary results from earlier meta-analyses were supported: case management is more effective than TAU conditions for improving outcomes, but this effect is significantly larger for treatment-related tasks than for personal functioning outcomes. Case management can be an important supplement to available services for improving linkage and retention, although further research is needed to assess its potential for supporting recovery from a longitudinal perspective. Introduction Rationale Substance use disorders (SUD) are associated with a wide range of consequences, including adverse health, social ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusion It is clear that clinically, there is still much to be learnt about alexithymia and its relationship with a range of related phenomena. Firstly, is alexithymia a continuous and stable trait independent of psychological or somatic symptomology that is developed during childhood? Or is it instead a reactive state induced by trauma and distress at any age, which serves to defend against intense and upsetting emotions? This impacts on treatment options. For example, should we be focussing on early childhood interventions which target the child's emotional environment and parenting to encourage emotional exp...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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