Permanent Hair Dyes and Chemical Straighteners May Be Linked to Breast Cancer, Study Says

Two common beauty products—permanent hair dyes and chemical straighteners—may be associated with an elevated risk for breast cancer, according to a new study published in the International Journal of Cancer. Hair dyes have been linked to other cancers before, though the research is inconclusive. Bladder and blood cancers have been examined most closely, according to the American Cancer Society, with the most consistent results pointing to a small increase in bladder cancer risk for salon employees. Meanwhile, most studies to date looking specifically at dye and breast cancer have not found a connection. The picture is similarly unclear for hair straighteners. While a major study using data from the mid-1990s did not find a link between straighteners and breast cancer, other, more recent studies have—and the researchers behind the new paper note that some straightening formulas popularized since the 1990s, namely keratin treatments, have been found to either contain the carcinogen formaldehyde, or release it during the application process. The new study, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, tracked 46,700 U.S. women enrolled in the Sister Study, which recruited breast-cancer-free women whose sisters had been diagnosed with the disease. At enrollment, the women ranged in age from 35 to 74. They answered questions about their health, lifestyle (including hair product use) and d...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cancer Source Type: news

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CONCLUSION: The lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence and mortality due to radiation exposure is not trivial. Therefore efforts should be made to reduce patient doses while maintaining image quality. PMID: 32871427 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Source: Clinical Breast Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Imaging Source Type: research
Overkill: When Modern Medicine Goes Too Far by Paul Offit M.D.I am admittedly a huge fanboy of Paul Offit, an infectious disease guru at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, one of the preeminent pediatric hospitals in the world. His latest bookOverall: When Modern Medicine Goes Too Far, is a collection of medical facts that are already known to the well-read individual, but fly in the face of wrongly-held, out-dated, commonly-believed medical concepts. The majority of the incorrect information was previously considered the standard of care, but newer and better science and studies have clearly demonstrated ...
Source: A Pediatrician's Blog - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurposeWe evaluated the contribution of rice intake, a source of dietary arsenic, to cancer risk in a population of women with likely low arsenic exposure from drinking water and variable rice intake who participated in the California Teachers Study.MethodsRice consumption was categorized into quartiles (
Source: Cancer Causes and Control - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: LncRNA CASC15 has the potential to become a new therapeutic target or marker for a variety of tumors. PMID: 32962611 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
The name Ruth Bader Ginsburg became almost synonymous with strength and stamina as she rose to prominence in judicial and feminist circles throughout her long career. Famously nicknamed the Notorious RBG and known for her grueling fitness regimen, the late Supreme Court justice also struggled with cancer and other health issues for the better part of her time on the bench — culminating with her death on Sept. 18 at the age of 87 of complications from metastatic pancreatic cancer. Ginsburg’s health issues became public in 1999, six years after her appointment to the Supreme Court, when she had surgery for early-...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime remembrance Source Type: news
In this study, the expressi on of ADAMTS9-AS1 was measured in CRC tissues and cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR analysis. The clinical significance of ADAMTS9-AS1 was evaluated with Chi-squared test, Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression analysis in CRC patients. CCK8 assay, colony formation assay, flow cytometry and transwell assay were used to explore the biological function of ADAMTS9-AS1 knockdown in CRC cell lines (SW1116 and HT29). We further explore the role of ADAMTS9-AS1 in vivo though xenograft tumor assay. Our data showed that ADAMTS9-AS1 expression level was significantly up-regulated in CRC ti...
Source: Human Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Because much cancer research and clinical trials have been based on white populations, efforts to explore the ways race and ethnicity influence disease are underway.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Race and Ethnicity Colon and Colorectal Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Black People Genetics and Heredity Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Mount Si Source Type: news
DB Nandini, Roopa S Rao, BS Deepak, Praveen B ReddyJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology 2020 24(2):405-405 Isothicyanates present in cruciferous vegetables are known to exhibit chemoprevention by various mechanisms. Presently, there is growing evidence that a phytochemical compound known as sulforaphane in these green leafy vegetables is found to be effective in preventing and treating various cancers such as prostate cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, skin, urinary bladder and oral cancers. This component is naturally present in the broccoli sprouts, kale, cabbage, cauliflower and garden cress and is available a...
Source: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract UNC-5 Homolog B (UNC5B) is a member of the dependence receptor family that regulates cell survival and apoptosis in a ligand-dependent manner. UNC5B plays an important role in the development of multiple cancers, including colorectal, bladder, and thyroid cancer. However, the exact expression pattern and mechanism of UNC5B in breast cancer have not been well elucidated. Here, we showed that UNC5B expression was significantly upregulated in breast cancer using bioinformatics analysis and experimental validation. High UNC5B expression was correlated with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients. UNC5...
Source: Aging - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: Aging (Albany NY) Source Type: research
DB Nandini, Roopa S Rao, BS Deepak, Praveen B ReddyJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology 2020 24(2):405-405 Isothicyanates present in cruciferous vegetables are known to exhibit chemoprevention by various mechanisms. Presently, there is growing evidence that a phytochemical compound known as sulforaphane in these green leafy vegetables is found to be effective in preventing and treating various cancers such as prostate cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, skin, urinary bladder and oral cancers. This component is naturally present in the broccoli sprouts, kale, cabbage, cauliflower and garden cress and is available a...
Source: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research
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