Epidemiologic risk factors for in situ and invasive ductal breast cancer among regularly screened postmenopausal women by grade in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort

ConclusionsThese results suggest heterogeneity by grade for breast cancer etiology. Identification of potential risk factor differences among low-grade and high-grade DCIS and IDBC may help to clarify associations, and ultimately, improve breast cancer risk prediction models.
Source: Cancer Causes and Control - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Related Links:

PANCREATIC cancer symptoms are often non-specific and vague in the beginning. One of the first noticeable signs is associated with your stomach.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 20 September 2020Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Reviews on CancerAuthor(s): Marjolein M.G. Kes, Jan Van den Bossche, Arjan W. Griffioen, Elisabeth J.M. Huijbers
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) Reviews on Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 September 2020Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Reviews on CancerAuthor(s): Hang-Ping Yao, Rachel Hudson, Ming-Hai Wang
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) Reviews on Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusion MTDH is pro-oncogenic factor playing multifaceted and diverse roles in cancer progression. Its association and central role in regulating signaling pathways such a MAPK, wnt/β-catenin, PI3K/AkT, NF-κβ pathways in various cancers shows that it plays a vital role in metastasis. MTDH contribution to chemo and radiotherapy resistance provides a new direction for the development of anticancer therapeutics. Multiple mechanisms converge to promote expression of MTDH in cancers. Further studies are therefore warranted to determine whether the elevated MTDH expression has prognostic value for development...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Author Affiliations open 1Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA 2Social &Scientific Systems, Inc., Durham, North Carolina, USA 3Westat, Durham, North Carolina, USA 4Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway 5Biostatistics and Computational Biology Branch, NIEHS, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA PDF Version (548 KB) Abstract About This Article Supplemental Material Bac...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: Although further work is required to confirm our results and to clarify potential mechanisms, our findings suggest that exposure to residential outdoor light at night may contribute to invasive breast cancer risk. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP935 Received: 08 August 2016 Revised: 17 March 2017 Accepted: 20 March 2017 Published: 17 August 2017 Address correspondence to P. James, 401 Park Dr., 3rd Floor West, Boston, MA 02215 USA. Telephone: (617) 525-2567; Email: pjames@hsph.harvard.edu Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP935). The authors declare they have no actual or pot...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
ConclusionsThere are numerous associations between health-related behaviors and mortality outcomes after a DCIS diagnosis.Implications for cancer survivorsWomen diagnosed with DCIS should be aware that their health-related behaviors are associated with mortality outcomes.
Source: Journal of Cancer Survivorship - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
We examined the association of post-diagnosis body mass index (BMI), physical activity and smoking with QoL among 1,448 DCIS survivors aged 20–74, who were diagnosed during 1995–2006 and enrolled in the population-based Wisconsin In Situ Cohort. Health behaviors and QoL were self-reported during biennial post- diagnosis interviews. Physical and mental QoL were measured using the validated SF-36 questionnaire (higher scores reflect more positive QoL). Generalized linear regression was used to establish QoL mean scores in cross-sectional analyses, with multivariable adjustment for age, comorbidity status, educati...
Source: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: ASPO 40th Annual Meeting Abstracts Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2015 Source:Preventive Medicine, Volume 80 Author(s): Amy M. Berkman, Amy Trentham-Dietz, Kim Dittus, Vicki Hart, Christine M. Vatovec, John G. King, Ted A. James, Susan G. Lakoski, Brian L. Sprague Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-invasive breast cancer that comprises approximately 20% of new breast cancer diagnoses. DCIS is predominantly detected by screening mammography prior to the development of any clinical symptoms. Prognosis following a DCIS diagnosis is excellent, due to both the availability of effective treatments and the frequently benign nature of the disease. Howe...
Source: Preventive Medicine - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research
Conclusions In this sister-matched case–control study of young-onset breast cancer, many of the studied risk factors were associated with young-onset invasive breast cancer. There were few discernable differences in risk factors for young-onset DCIS versus young-onset invasive breast cancer.
Source: Cancer Causes and Control - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
More News: Alcoholism | Breast Cancer | Breast Carcinoma | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Carcinoma | Carcinoma in Situ | DCIS (Ductal Carcinoma in Situ) | Ductal Carcinoma | Epidemiology | Mammography | Nutrition | Study | Women