Food allergy and the microbiome: Current understandings and future directions

Growing evidence points to an important role for the commensal microbiota in susceptibility to food allergy. Epidemiologic studies demonstrate associations between exposures known to modify the microbiome and risk of food allergy. Direct profiling of the gut microbiome in human cohort studies has demonstrated that individuals with food allergy have distinct gut microbiomes compared to healthy control subjects, and dysbiosis precedes the development of food allergy. Mechanistic studies in mouse models of food allergy have confirmed that the composition of the intestinal microbiota can imprint susceptibility or resistance to food allergy on the host and have identified a unique population of microbially responsive ROR γt-positive FOXp3-positive regulatory T cells as critical for the maintenance of tolerance to foods.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Reviews and feature article Source Type: research

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Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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