Functional Connectivity in Neurodegenerative Disorders: Alzheimer's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia

Neurodegenerative disorders are a growing cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Onset is typically insidious and clinical symptoms of behavioral change, memory loss, or cognitive dysfunction may not be evident early in the disease process. Efforts have been made to discover biomarkers that allow for earlier diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders, to initiate treatment that may slow the course of clinical deterioration. Neuronal dysfunction occurs earlier than clinical symptoms manifest. Thus, assessment of neuronal function using functional brain imaging has been examined as a potential biomarker. While most early studies used task-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with the more recent technique of resting-state fMRI, “intrinsic” relationships between brain regions or brain networks have been studied in greater detail in neurodegenerative disorders. In Alzheimer's disease, the most common neurodegenerative disorder, and frontotemporal dementia, another of the common dementias, specific brain networks may be particularly susceptible to dysfunction. In this review, we highlight the major findings of functional connectivity assessed by resting state fMRI in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia.
Source: Topics in Magnetic Resonance Imaging - Category: Radiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research

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This study will be the first clinical trial to identify the therapeutic potential ofKami Guibi-tang for amnestic MCI. The findings will provide insight into the feasibility of large-scale trials to gather evidence for KGT as a treatment for MCI.Trial registrationKorean Clinical Trial Registry, ID:KCT0002407. Registered on 30 March 2017.
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
ConclusionsThe results provide in vivo evidence for selective vulnerability of ON and DMN in AD and significantly improves the viable clinical applications of olfactory testing. A network ‐based approach, focusing on network integrity rather than focal pathology, seems beneficial to olfactory prediction of dementia in AD.
Source: Brain and Behavior - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
In this study, we show that calorie restriction is protective against age-related increases in senescence and microglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in an animal model of aging. Further, these protective effects mitigated age-related decline in neuroblast and neuronal production, and enhanced olfactory memory performance, a behavioral index of neurogenesis in the SVZ. Our results support the concept that calorie restriction might be an effective anti-aging intervention in the context of healthy brain aging. Greater Modest Activity in Late Life Correlates with Lower Incidence of Dementia ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The research community has moved quite determinedly these past few years towards practical, low-cost tests for early Alzheimer's disease. Even with the limited means available to patients today, an early warning might be used to delay the aggregation of amyloid-β that takes place in the initial stages of the condition, before the appearance of cognitive impairment. Lifestyle changes such as weight loss and improved fitness, antiviral therapies, and control of chronic inflammation should all make some difference, given what is known of the mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease. Looking ahead, better options may soon be ava...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurological disorder in which the death of brain cells causes memory loss and cognitive decline. The identification of at-risk subjects yet showing no dementia symptoms but who will later convert to AD can be crucial for the effective treatment of AD. For this, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is expected to play a crucial role. During recent years, several Machine Learning (ML) approaches to AD-conversion prediction have been proposed using different types of MRI features.
Source: Magnetic Resonance Imaging - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Original contribution Source Type: research
Can playing Super Mario 64 for 30 minutes a day, five days a week help prevent the onset of Alzheimer's disease?By Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomThis new research study is important, andI believe Alzheimer's caregivers should take a good look at the findings.Playing 3 D video games seems to increase gray matter volume in the hippocampus and cerebellum. The kew word here is the hippocampus.New information enters the brain through the entorhinal cortex, and then is relayed to thehippocampus for short term memory storage.The hippocampus is the part of the brain that sends new memories to the different part of the brain f...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimers Alzheimers Prevention brain brain health cognitive impairment dementia lifestyle mentia health Super Mario 64 Source Type: blogs
Conclusions : The outcomes of this phase 3 trial will highlight the potential therapeutic value of tau aggregation inhibitor therapy in AD. A second phase 3 trial of LMTM for AD will be completed and reported later in 2016.
Source: The Neurocritic - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Source Type: blogs
We describe a case of PCA in which a combination of imaging methods, in conjunction with symptoms and neurological and neuropsychological examinations, led to its being diagnosed and to AD being identified as its probable cause. Treatment with donepezil for 6 months mildly improved alexia symptoms, but other symptoms remained unchanged. A 59-year-old Japanese woman with progressive alexia, visual deficit, and mild memory loss was referred to our neurologic clinic for the evaluation of right homonymous hemianopsia. Our neurological examination showed alexia, constructional apraxia, mild disorientation, short-term memory los...
Source: Journal of Nippon Medical School - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: J Nippon Med Sch Source Type: research
Abstract The patient was an 81‐year‐old man who had been treated for hypertension for several decades. In 2012, he developed gait disturbance and mild amnesia. One year later, his gait disturbance worsened, and he developed urinary incontinence. Conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging using T2‐weighted images and fluid‐attenuated inversion recovery showed multiple lacunar infarctions. These findings fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for subcortical ischaemic vascular dementia. However, susceptibility weighted imaging showed multiple lobar microbleeds in the bilateral occipitoparietal lobes, and double inversi...
Source: Psychogeriatrics - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
Abstract The patient was an 81‐year‐old man who had been treated for hypertension for several decades. In 2012, he developed gait disturbance and mild amnesia. One year later, his gait disturbance worsened, and he developed urinary incontinence. Conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging using T2‐weighted images and fluid‐attenuated inversion recovery showed multiple lacunar infarctions. These findings fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for subcortical ischaemic vascular dementia. However, susceptibility weighted imaging showed multiple lobar microbleeds in the bilateral occipitoparietal lobes, and double inversi...
Source: Psychogeriatrics - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
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