Norovirus symptoms: Do you have food poisoning or the winter vomiting bug? How to tell

NOROVIRUS has been causing outbreaks across the UK resulting in school and hospital ward closures. The illness causes similar symptoms to those of food poisoning, so how do you know which one you have?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Abstract In Japan, from 2000 to 2018, for Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella food poisonings, the annual number of the outbreaks and that of the patients decreased exponentially though the size of the individual outbreaks (the number of patients per outbreak) tended to become larger. For food poisonings caused by Campylobacter, the annual number of the outbreaks increased exponentially while the outbreak size became smaller and the annual number of the patients remained almost unchanged. For food poisoning caused by norovirus, both the number of the outbreaks and that of the patients remained high throughout. ...
Source: Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Jpn J Infect Dis Source Type: research
ConclusionsVarious HuNoV genotypes including GII.2, GII.4, GII.6, and GII.17 were shown to be associated with various types of outbreak sites (at childcare and educational facilities, involving cases of food poisoning, and at elderly nursing homes) in this study. These genotypes emerged in recent years, and their prevalence patterns differed from each other. Moreover, differences in outbreak sites and viral load of patients among the genotypes were identified.
Source: Gut Pathogens - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
PMID: 30381687 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Jpn J Infect Dis Source Type: research
This study investigated norovirus contamination of groundwater treatment systems at 1360 sites in seven metropolitan areas and nine provinces in 2015-2016. Temperature, pH, residual chlorine, and turbidity content were assessed to analyze the water quality. In 2015, six sites were positive for the presence of NoV (0.88%) and in 2016, two sites were positive (0.29%); in total, NoV was detected in 8 of the 1360 sample sites (0.59%) investigated. Identified genotypes of NoV in groundwater included GI.5, 9 and GII.4, 6, 13, 17, and 21. GII.17 was the most prevalent genotype in treated groundwater used in the food industry. Thi...
Source: International Journal of Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Int J Food Microbiol Source Type: research
PMID: 29491240 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Jpn J Infect Dis Source Type: research
Authors: Somura Y, Kimoto K, Oda M, Okutsu Y, Kato R, Suzuki Y, Siki D, Hirai A, Akiba T, Shinkai T, Sadamasu K Abstract In February 2017, four food poisoning outbreaks occurred in Tokyo, involving ten schools. Shredded dried laver seaweed processed by a single food manufacturer in December 2016 was provided in common for the school meals that caused all four outbreaks. Of 4,209 persons exposed, 1,193 (28.3%) had symptoms of gastroenteritis. Norovirus (NoV) GII was detected in 207 (78.1%) of 265 cases by real-time RT-PCR. Thirty-one shredded dried laver seaweed samples were examined and seven (22.6%) of them were p...
Source: Shokuhin eiseigaku zasshi. Journal of the Food Hygienic Society of Japan - Category: Food Science Tags: Shokuhin Eiseigaku Zasshi Source Type: research
Authors: Somura Y, Kimoto K, Oda M, Nagano M, Okutsu Y, Mori K, Akiba T, Sadamasu K Abstract During 2015-2016, we examined norovirus (NoV) RNA in swab specimens collected for investigation of suspected food poisoning outbreaks in Tokyo by real-time RT-PCR. Of 1,726 swab samples, 65 (3.8%) were NoV-positive and all positive swab samples were derived from NoV-positive outbreaks. Swab specimens were positive in 41 of 181 (22.7%) NoV outbreaks, while no positive swabs were detected in NoV-negative outbreaks. PCR fragments amplified from 32 swabs were sequenced, and all of them displayed complete homology with sequences...
Source: Shokuhin eiseigaku zasshi. Journal of the Food Hygienic Society of Japan - Category: Food Science Tags: Shokuhin Eiseigaku Zasshi Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Medical Virology - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
In this study, the viability of norovirus in various types of salads and dressings was examined using murine norovirus strain 1 (MNV-1) as a surrogate for the closely related human norovirus. In addition, the inactivation of MNV-1 in salads was examined using heat-denatured lysozyme, which had been reported to inactivate norovirus. MNV-1 was inoculated in 4 types of salads (coleslaw, thousand island salad, vinaigrette salad, egg salad) and 3 types of dressings (mayonnaise, thousand island dressing, vinaigrette dressing), stored at 4°C for 5days. The results revealed that in the vinaigrette dressing, the infectivity of ...
Source: International Journal of Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Int J Food Microbiol Source Type: research
As with the recent norovirus outbreaks, whatever claims that a restaurant may make about its food being organic, locally sourced, or from animals that were naturally raised, treated well, unstressed, did yoga, etc. have little to do with the risk of food poisoning. So how do you avoid food poisoning from a restaurant?
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
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