How Rising Temperatures Due to Climate Change are Shortening Pregnancies

It’s bad enough that adults have made a climatological mess of the world. It’s worse that the mess is having a disproportionate impact on kids—who did nothing to create the problem, but are more susceptible to health issues caused by rising temperatures than adults are. Now, it appears, global warming is doing its damage even further down the human age spectrum. According to a new study published in Nature Climate Change, rising temperatures may have a direct impact on human gestational time, increasing the risk of early delivery. Babies are considered premature when they are born at 37 weeks or earlier. But delivery between 37 and 40 weeks is still not considered ideal, with late-term births correlated to lower birthweight and even potential cognitive development problems later in life. Many variables can cause an otherwise healthy pregnancy to come to term earlier than it should—one is extreme heat. To study this effect, Alan Barreca, an associate professor at UCLA’s Institute of Environmental Sustainability, and economist Jessamyn Schaller of Claremont McKenna College, analyzed daily temperature and county-by-county birth rates across the U.S. in a two-decade window from 1969 to 1988. That is an admittedly old dataset, but the researchers had little choice. “In 1989, the vital statistics system started to be more cautious about information it allowed out publicly in order to make it hard to identify individuals precisely by place or dat...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized birth climate change Environment gestation health Labor Pregnancy Source Type: news

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Conditions:   Apnea, Obstructive Sleep;   Obesity Intervention:   Device: Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) Sponsor:   Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
By AMEYA KULKARNI, MD When Samuel Morse left his New Haven home to paint a portrait of the Maquis du Lafayette in Washington DC, it was the last time he would see his pregnant wife. Shortly after his arrival in Washington, his wife developed complications during childbirth. A messenger took several days on horseback to relay the message to Mr Morse. Because the trip back to New Haven took several more, his wife had died by the time he arrived at their home.  So moved was he by the tragedy of lost time that he dedicated the majority of the rest of his life to make sure that this would never happen to anyone again. H...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Policy Medical Practice Ameya Kulkarni Global Health Maternal mortality public health Source Type: blogs
It’s bad enough that adults have made a climatological mess of the world. It’s worse that the mess is having a disproportionate impact on kids—who did nothing to create the problem, but are more susceptible to health issues caused by rising temperatures than adults are. Now, it appears, global warming is doing its damage even further down the human age spectrum. According to a new study published in Nature Climate Change, rising temperatures may have a direct impact on human gestational time, increasing the risk of early delivery. Babies are considered premature when they are born at 37 weeks or earlier. ...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized birth climate change Environment gestation health Labor Pregnancy Source Type: news
The sleep quality of pregnant women in the third trimester is related to mental health. However, there is still a lack of large-scale cohort research exploring this relationship in the second trimester. Thus, ...
Source: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewPrevalence of gestational diabetes is increasing globally and sleep may be a modifiable lifestyle factor associated with it. However, existing findings have been inconsistent.Recent FindingsMajority of studies reviewed found a link between extreme sleep durations and elevated risk of maternal hyperglycemia. The findings with sleep-disordered breathing are less consistent. Methodological differences across studies, in terms of sleep assessment methods (subjective vs. objective), study population (low vs. high risk), classification of gestational diabetes and sleep problems, may have contributed to t...
Source: Current Diabetes Reports - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conditions:   Pregnancy Complications;   Pregnancy Related;   Weight Gain;   Weight Change Trajectory;   High Risk Pregnancy Intervention:   Behavioral: Activity Intervention Sponsor:   University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
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