Feeding premature babies breast milk could reduce heart damage caused by an early birth, study finds

Babies born before full-term - 37 weeks -are more at risk of heart problems. Irish scientists have found breast milk can alleviate the problem after reviewing evidence.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Abstract Background: The improvement in surgical techniques has contributed to an increasing number of childbearing women with complex congenital heart disease (CCC). However, adequate counseling about pregnancy in this situation is uncertain, due to a wide variety of residual cardiac lesions. Objectives: To evaluate fetal and maternal outcomes in pregnant women with CCC and to analyze the predictive variables of prognosis. Methods: During 10 years we followed 435 consecutive pregnancies in patients (pts) with congenital heart disease. Among of them, we selected 42 pregnancies in 40 (mean age of 25.5 ± 4.5 years) pt...
Source: Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Abstract Background: The improvement in surgical techniques has contributed to an increasing number of childbearing women with complex congenital heart disease (CCC). However, adequate counseling about pregnancy in this situation is uncertain, due to a wide variety of residual cardiac lesions. Objectives: To evaluate fetal and maternal outcomes in pregnant women with CCC and to analyze the predictive variables of prognosis. Methods: During 10 years we followed 435 consecutive pregnancies in patients (pts) with congenital heart disease. Among of them, we selected 42 pregnancies in 40 (mean age of 25.5 ± 4.5 years) pt...
Source: Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Pediatric coronary artery surgery technique is now established as the standard safety surgical choice, as a new area in cardiac surgery. Congenital heart surgeons after proper training are able to use coronary transfer and bypass surgery safely even in premature babies. Orv Hetil. 2019; 160(49): 1935-1940. PMID: 31786939 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Orvosi Hetilap - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Orv Hetil Source Type: research
Aww … home for the holidays. Gatherings with family can create cherished memories. However, parents of children with feeding and swallowing disorders can find navigating holiday meals particularly difficult. As feeding and swallowing specialists, we speech-language pathologists can do much to serve our clients by offering tips to reduce food-related holiday stress. Parents often go on high alert when managing their child’s feeding and swallowing difficulties outside the home. In preparing to travel, they might pack suitcases full of g-tube supplies or specific foods to help make sure their child consumes enoug...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Health Care Private Practice Slider Speech-Language Pathology Dysphagia Early Intervention Feeding Disorders Swallowing Disorders Source Type: blogs
Mind-reading exoskeletons, digital tattoos, 3D printed drugs, RFID implants for recreational purposes: mindblowing innovations come to medicine and healthcare almost every single day. We shortlisted some of the greatest ideas and developments that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine, but we found so many that we had trouble fitting them into one article. Here are the first ten spectacular medical innovations to watch for. 1) Mixed reality opens new ways for medical education Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality are all technologies opening new worlds for the human senses. While the difference between...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing artificial food brain-computer interface cyborg digital tattoos drug development exoskeleton gamification google glass health insurance Healthcare Innovation List Medical education medical techn Source Type: blogs
Abbott Laboratories is bringing two of its pediatric devices in the cardiology space to Europe. The Abbott Park, IL-based company has received CE mark for both the Masters HP 15mm rotatable mechanical heart valve and the Amplatzer Piccolo Occluder. The Masters valve is the world's smallest mechanical heart valve and allows doctors to treat babies and toddlers in need of a mitral or aortic heart valve replacement. Until Abbott's device, surgeons could only use a range of larger-sized valves to replace a pediatric heart valve that could not be repaired, which could result in improper fit and complications. The Masters pediat...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Cardiovascular Source Type: news
AbstractWhen should doctors seek protective custody to override a parent ’s refusal of potentially lifesaving treatment for their child? The answer to this question seemingly has different answers for different subspecialties of pediatrics. This paper specifically looks at different thresholds for physicians overriding parental refusals of life-sustaining treatment bet ween neonatology, cardiology, and oncology. The threshold for mandating treatment of premature babies seems to be a survival rate of 25–50%. This is not the case when the treatment in question is open heart surgery for a child with congenital hea...
Source: HEC Forum - Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research
Recently, engineers in a variety of institutions have been making great progress in the field of flexible electronics. A variety of devices have been made, including completely flexible body-worn sensors. While a great deal of the components have ind...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Diagnostics Materials Medicine Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs
Flexible body-worn sensors that conform to the skin have great potential for monitoring patient health, conducting long-term studies, and giving consumers a way to track their exercise and overall health. Although there have been flexible sticker-lik...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Cardiology Diagnostics Geriatrics Medicine Sports Medicine Telemedicine Source Type: blogs
Other studies have linked living near gas and oil sites to premature births, smaller babies, migraines and fatigue.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Oil (Petroleum) and Gasoline Premature Babies Natural Gas Drilling and Boring Hazardous and Toxic Substances Migraine Headaches Air Pollution Pregnancy and Childbirth Heart Source Type: news
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