Evaluation of the epidemiology of peanut allergy in the United Kingdom.

Evaluation of the epidemiology of peanut allergy in the United Kingdom. Expert Rev Clin Immunol. 2019 Nov 27;:1-7 Authors: Scott LA, Jones BI, Berni TR, Berni ER, De Vries J, Currie CJ Abstract Aims: To describe the epidemiology of peanut allergy (PA) in the UK over the last three decades.Methods: PA patients were identified from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink between 1987 and 2015. Incidence and prevalence of PA were compared between 2000 and 2015. Prevalence and relative risk (RR) of atopic comorbidities, anaphylaxis, adrenaline prescriptions versus matched controls were calculated.Results: Point prevalence of PA in the entire population and those
Source: Expert Review of Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Expert Rev Clin Immunol Source Type: research

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Discussion There are 8 common foods which compromise 90% of food allergens with those being peanuts, soybeans, cow’s milk, eggs, fish, crustacean/shellfish, wheat and tree nuts. Some people believe that lupin (a legume) is 9th. Legumes belong to the Fabaceae family. They provide protein, fat, vitamins other essential nutrients and therefore are used in the human diet throughout the world. “[A]llergenicity due to consumption of legumes in decreasing order may be peanut, soybean, lentil, chickpea, pea, mung bean and red gram.” Other common legumes include alfalfa, clovers, beans, lupins, mesquite, carob...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe purpose of this article is to review recent developments demonstrating the role of allergies, the utility of allergy testing, and the role of the allergist in eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) management.Recent FindingsThe majority of patients with EoE have concurrent atopic disorders including food anaphylaxis, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema. An atopic population likely is at greater risk for EoE. Delayed type hypersensitivity to food antigens is the most common pathogenic mechanism. Aeroallergens and pollen-food cross-reactivity also can trigger EoE. Th2 cell –mediated adaptive and ...
Source: Current Gastroenterology Reports - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Conclusions: In asthma and allergy, multimorbidity and polypharmacy are major concerns. Disease severity, drug use, and costs increased with multimorbid conditions. To reduce the burden, allergy management should be better integrated and more comprehensive.Int Arch Allergy Immunol
Source: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In this study, we tried to reveal the allergenic potential of several Asteraceae species. The Asteraceae-related allergy symptoms involve eczema, hay fever, asthma, or even anaphylaxis. Furthermore, the evidence of severe cross-reactivity with food and pollen allergens (PFS) in patients sensitive to Asteraceae allergens have been announced. Further identification and characterization of secondary metabolites and possible allergens in Asteraceae are necessary for the better understanding of Asteraceae-related immune response. The Asteraceae allergy screening panel (the SL mix and the Compositae mix of five plant species) is...
Source: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Environ Sci Pollut Res Int Source Type: research
Find out how harmless substances can cause the characteristic symptoms of hay fever, eczema, asthma, food allergy, and anaphylaxis.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Allergy Source Type: news
DISCUSSION SESSION 1: Food allergy (PD01 –PD05)PD01 Allergen-specific humoral and cellular responses in children who fail egg oral immunotherapy due to allergic reactionsMarta Vazquez-Ortiz, Mariona Pascal, Ana Maria Plaza, Manel JuanPD02 FoxP3 epigenetic features in children with cow milk allergyLorella Paparo, Rita Nocerino, Rosita Aitoro, Ilaria Langella, Antonio Amoroso, Alessia Amoroso, Carmen Di Scala, Roberto Berni CananiPD04 Combined milk and egg allergy in early childhood: let them eat cake?Santanu Maity, Giuseppina Rotiroti, Minal GandhiPD05 Introduction of complementary foods in relation to allergy and gut...
Source: Clinical and Translational Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Table of Contents A1 Pirfenidone inhibits TGF-b1-induced extracellular matrix production in nasal polyp-derived fibroblasts Jae-Min Shin, Heung-Man Lee, Il-Ho Park A2 The efficacy of a 2-week course of oral steroid in the treatment of chronic spontaneous urticaria refractory to antihistamines Hyun-Sun Yoon, Gyeong Yul Park A3 The altered distribution of follicular t helper cells may predict a more pronounced clinical course of primary sjögren’s syndrome Margit Zeher A4 Betamethasone suppresses Th2 cell development induced by langerhans cell li...
Source: World Allergy Organization Journal - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusion This was a follow-up study of a well-designed randomised controlled trial. The original study found the early introduction of regular small amounts of peanut protein to infants at high risk of having peanut allergy reduced the proportion that developed a peanut allergy by the age of five, compared with avoiding peanuts completely. The latest study found that even if the children who had been exposed to peanuts then avoided them for 12 months, this did not significantly increase their likelihood of developing a peanut allergy. Strengths of the study include the use of objective tests to determine...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Pregnancy/child Source Type: news
By Adam Collison, Elizabeth Percival, Joerg Mattes, and Rani Bhatia of the University of Newcastle. This story was originally published by The Conversation. Allergies are reactions caused by the immune system as it responds to environmental substances that are usually harmless to most people. They may occur in response to a range of different material (called allergens), such as food, pollen, dust mites, animals, insect stings, or medicines. An allergy can affect different parts of the body. Allergic rhinitis, or hay fever, for instance, affects the nose and eyes, while eczema affects the skin. Food allergies aff...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
This review provides an overview of the use of antihistamines in children. We discuss types of histamine receptors and their mechanism of action, absorption, onset and duration of action of first-generation and second-generation H(1)-antihistamines, as well as elimination of H(1)-antihistamines which has important implications for dosing in children. The rationale for the use of H(1)-antihistamines is explored for the relief of histamine-mediated symptoms in a variety of allergic conditions including: non-anaphylactic allergic reactions, atopic eczema (AE), allergic rhinitis (AR) and conjunctivitis, chronic spontaneous urt...
Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Education and Practice - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Eye Diseases, Immunology (including allergy), Drugs: CNS (not psychiatric), Ophthalmology, Child health, Asthma, Dermatology Pharmacy update Source Type: research
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