The eyes have it

Eyes are a worry aren’t they? I use mine a lot…but I have all these little floater things bobbing about, I see them when I use my PC, when I’m on the phone, when I’m outside on a sunny day, sitting reading, watching TV, playing guitar, taking photos, singing. All the time, actually. They’re always there. I was getting worried. Couple that to the need to find my glasses to read anything at all or look at an object any smaller than an inch across, and it’s all a bit worrying. So, nice to have an eye test where nothing truly untoward is revealed, just a slight and inevitably sliding into age-related long-sightedness and a new prescription for computer glasses and reading glasses. Those floaters, apparently, I’ve not got many at all, all very normal and healthy in there. Look, here’s your retina, how healthy is that? Oh, but there’s glaucoma in the family and my eye pressures were slightly different from each other (15 in the right eye 19 in t’other). That means I have to have a so-called “field test” Look at the tiny, faint white lights on this screen and click a button to say you’ve seen one as they illuminate randomly across your field of vision. I was not seeing the light in the field test, well, one faint point. I was consistently missing it in the test and had missed the same point point the last time…retinal damage, something amiss? Immediate neurotic conclusion is that blindness is comi...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

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Increases in the number of cell therapies in the preclinical and clinical phases have prompted the need for reliable and noninvasive assays to validate transplant function in clinical biomanufacturing. We developed a robust characterization methodology composed of quantitative bright-field absorbance microscopy (QBAM) and deep neural networks (DNNs) to noninvasively predict tissue function and cellular donor identity. The methodology was validated using clinical-grade induced pluripotent stem cell–derived retinal pigment epithelial cells (iPSC-RPE). QBAM images of iPSC-RPE were used to train DNNs that predicted iPSC-...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), a genetic bleeding disorder leading to systemic arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the ALK1/ENG/Smad1/5/8 pathway. Evidence suggests that HHT pathogenesis strongly relies on overactivated PI3K/Akt/mTOR and VEGFR2 pathways in endothelial cells (ECs). In the BMP9/10-immunoblocked (BMP9/10ib) neonatal mouse model of HHT, we report here that the mTOR inhibitor, sirolimus, and the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nintedanib, could synergistically fully block, but also reversed, retinal AVMs to avert retinal bleeding and anemia. Sirolimus...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
The advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provided a means for avoiding ethical concerns associated with the use of cells isolated from human embryos. The number of labs now using iPSCs to generate photoreceptor, retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE), and more recently choroidal endothelial cells has grown exponentially. However, for autologous cell replacement to be effective, manufacturing strategies will need to change. Many tasks carried out by hand will need simplifying and automating. In this issue of the JCI, Schaub and colleagues combined quantitative brightfield microscopy and artificial intelligence...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Haritoglou C, Maier M, Neubauer AS, Augustin AJ Abstract Introduction: Diabetic macular edema (DME) is a sight threatening disease and a major cause for blindness for people in working age. The pathogenesis is multifactorial and complex. The pharmacotherapy of DME addresses both the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by the intravitreal injection of VEGF inhibitors and inflammatory processes by the intravitreal application of steroids. Several trials have been published reporting on the efficacy and safety of these treatments.Areas covered: This review discusses original research artic...
Source: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Expert Opin Pharmacother Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 January 2020Source: NeuronAuthor(s): Raunak Sinha, Tabrez J. Siddiqui, Nirmala Padmanabhan, Julie Wallin, Chi Zhang, Benyamin Karimi, Fred Rieke, Ann Marie Craig, Rachel O. Wong, Mrinalini HoonSummaryLRRTM4 is a transsynaptic adhesion protein regulating glutamatergic synapse assembly on dendrites of central neurons. In the mouse retina, we find that LRRTM4 is enriched at GABAergic synapses on axon terminals of rod bipolar cells (RBCs). Knockout of LRRTM4 reduces RBC axonal GABAA and GABAC receptor clustering and disrupts presynaptic inhibition onto RBC terminals. LRRTM4 removal also pe...
Source: Neuron - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Carotenoids recent advances in cell and molecular biology edited by Johannes von Lintig and Loredana Quadro.
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids - Category: Lipidology Source Type: research
Easy-to-use, accessible and relatively low-cost solution for a widely experienced problem: these are my favorite digital health innovations. EyeQue Insight lets anyone test their vision at home so people living in rural areas, with special needs or no access to transportation could still make sure they have the necessary sight test from time to time. Here’s our EyeQue Insight review. Have you seen the numbers? What about the letters? Eye problems are global phenomena: the World Health Organisation estimates that approximately 1.3 billion people live with some form of vision impairment. That means on average at least ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Medical Professionals Patients eye eye test future home Innovation ophthalmology review technology testing vision Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, a PET camera was used to examine individual differences in the D2 system in a group consisting of 181 healthy individuals between the age of 64 and 68. All participants also had to take part in an all-inclusive performance test of the long-term episodic memory, working memory and processing speed along with an MRI assessment (which was used to measure the size of various parts of the brain). Researchers could see that the D2 system was positively linked to episodic memory, but not to working memory or to processing speed by relating PET registrations to the cognitive data. Researchers could also see that the...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Once the optic nerve that’s responsible for sight is damaged, it’s impossible to see again. At least that’s been the dogma. But a group of U.S. scientists has upended that thinking and helped mice with destroyed optic nerves to see again. It does not have immediate implications for humans yet, but it points researchers in promising new directions. Andrew Huberman, an associate professor of neurobiology at Stanford University, and his team describe their advance in a study published in Nature Neuroscience. To learn about the way vision nerves grow, they crushed the optic nerve in one eye of mice. Once dest...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized blindness eye sight eyes medicine Vision vision loss Source Type: news
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