Prevention of Non-peanut Food Allergies

AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe purpose of this review article is to discuss the recent literature around methods of prevention of food allergies other than peanut allergy.Recent FindingsWhile the most robust data to date exists for peanut, there are emerging studies suggesting a beneficial effect to early introduction of cooked egg, and cow ’s milk as well. While the literature is sparse for other allergens such as tree nuts, finned fish, and shellfish, the mechanism of sensitization is thought to be the same and no study to date has demonstrated a harm with allergenic introduction in the 4–6 months of age window (nor has there bee n level 1 evidence of benefit to delay of such allergens). This strategy is safe, and pre-emptive testing is not required prior to allergenic solid introduction.SummaryAll allergenic solids should be introduced at around 6, but not before 4, months of age in infants at high risk.
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

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This article provides highlights of the clinically impactful original studies and reviews published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice in 2019 on the subjects of anaphylaxis, asthma, dermatitis, drug allergy, food allergy, immunodeficiency, immunotherapy, rhinitis/sinusitis, and urticaria/angioedema/mast cell disorders. Within each topic, practical aspects of diagnosis and management are emphasized. Treatments discussed include lifestyle modifications, allergen avoidance therapy, positive and negative effects of pharmacologic therapy, and various forms of immunologic and desensitization manageme...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe prevalence of food allergy is increasing. At the current time, there are no approved treatments for food allergy. Major limitations of immunotherapy are long treatment periods (months or years), frequent clinic visits, high costs, increased risk of adverse events during treatment, and lack of durability of desensitization. Additionally, it is allergen-specific, and in those allergic to multiple allergens, the length and cost of treatment are further increased. In this review, we summarize recent developments in novel non-allergen-specific treatments for food allergy.Recent FindingsA number of m...
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Food allergies are common, affecting 1 in 13 children in the US 1 2. They pose a significant burden on the allergic child and their family with reported physical and emotional impact. Food-allergic children are required to avoid their food triggers; unfortunately, this can be difficult when eating outside the home or travelling 3 4. Additionally, food labels can often be misleading and accidental exposures may result in severe allergic reactions 5. The risk of a severe reaction creates a lot of anxiety in the daily life of food-allergic children and is often associated with significant limitations in their social interactions.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 7 January 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Helen T. Wang, Christopher M. Warren, Ruchi S. Gupta, Carla DavisAbstractBackgroundShellfish allergy (SA) is one of the most common food allergies causing anaphylaxis in adults and children. There is limited data showing the prevalence of SA in US children.ObjectiveTo determine the prevalence and reaction characteristics of SA in the US pediatric population.MethodsA cross-sectional food allergy prevalence survey was administered via phone and web by the National Opinion Research Center at the Unive...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Data are emerging to confirm our clinical experience that many food-allergic patients experience stereotypical symptoms following allergen exposure, both in the community and at supervised oral food challenge, in a manner that varies from one patient to another. Integrating datasets from different cohorts and applying unbiased machine-learning analyses may demonstrate specific food allergy endotypes, in a similar way to asthma. Whether this results in improvements in patient management (e.g. through facilitating risk stratification or impacting on the decision to prescribe EAI and, perhaps, the number of device...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
KM PMID: 31923545 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
Food allergy encompasses a range of food hypersensitivities. Different clinical phenotypes for food allergy are likely to exist, in much the same way as endotype discovery is now a major research theme in asthma. We discuss the emerging evidence for different reaction phenotypes i.e. symptoms experienced following allergen exposure in food-allergic individuals, and their relevance for clinical practice.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
The prevalence of allergic diseases and asthma has been on the rise in developed countries for the past 50 years, likely associated with changes in living conditions that have inhibited certain early-life microbial exposures normally instrumental in the development of the infant immune system. Consistent with this, a large body of data to date suggests that living on farms is associated with a major reduction in the risk of asthma and atopic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, including studies from Europe1,2 and North America among the Indiana Amish3,4.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Purpose of review Epigenetic mechanisms are known to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, food allergy, and other allergic disorders, especially through mediating the effects of the environmental factors, well recognized allergy-risk modifiers. The aim of this work was to provide a concise but comprehensive review of the recent progress in the epigenetics of allergic diseases. Recent findings Recent few years have substantially expanded our knowledge on the role of epigenetics in the pathogenesis and clinical picture of allergies. Specifically, it has been shown that...
Source: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: MECHANISMS OF ALLERGY AND ADULT ASTHMA: Edited by J. Andrew Grant and Enrico Heffler Source Type: research
In the early 1990s, doctors began describing a new condition affecting the esophagus of patients who were predisposed to allergies including food allergy, asthma, and eczema, and who were having trouble swallowing. Today, we call this condition eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). What is EoE? EoE is an allergic inflammation of the esophagus that causes a range of symptoms. Adolescents and adults most often experience it as difficulty swallowing, sometimes feeling like food moves too slowly through the esophagus and into the stomach. In some cases, food actually gets stuck (and may require urgent removal). Children and some adu...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Allergies Digestive Disorders Health Source Type: blogs
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