Why You Should Add Rest to Your Workout Routine

Most fitness advice urges people to squeeze in more workouts. That’s reasonable, considering government data show that only about a quarter of American adults meet the current guidelines for adequate physical activity: 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity per week, plus two bouts of muscle-strengthening exercise. Meeting these guidelines is important, since getting enough exercise can improve an individual’s physical and mental health. But when it comes to exercise, it is possible to have too much of a good thing. In fact, research suggests taking strategic time off from your workout routine can maximize the benefits of physical activity, and minimize the risks. “Rest and recovery absolutely are necessary,” says Hunter Paris, an associate professor of sports medicine at Pepperdine University in California. “Fatigue, to a degree, is beneficial [because it signifies progress]. But there comes a point where fatigue can accumulate and overwhelm a bit.” Studies back that up. One published in 2018 argues that there’s a “Goldilocks Zone” for exercise—that is, a sweet spot between getting too little physical activity (which is linked to a higher risk of heart disease and cancer, among other chronic illnesses) and too much (which, especially for middle-aged and older adults, can increase the risk for heart issues and premature death by placing too much strain on the body). The paper advises agai...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness Source Type: news

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SummaryPurpose Anticancer agents are known to increase cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT) onset. CAT onset rate is reported to be 1.92% in cisplatin-based therapy, 6.1% in paclitaxel plus ramucirumab combination therapy, and 11.9% in bevacizumab monotherapy. Because immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) cause a sudden increase in T cell number, an association between administration of these drugs and increase in CAT incidence is likely. However, the extent to which ICI administration affects CAT incidence remains unclear. Further, risk factors for CAT incidence have not yet been identified. The present study investigated CAT...
Source: Investigational New Drugs - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: During the last century, AADRs among males declined more slowly than among females. Although the gap diminished in recent decades, exploration of social and behavioral factors may inform interventions that could further reduce death rates among males. PMID: 31804898 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Public Health Reports - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Public Health Rep Source Type: research
SATURDAY, Dec. 7, 2019 -- If you can tackle a tough workout, that may bode well for your longevity, new research suggests. A woman's risk of dying from heart disease, cancer or other causes is much lower if she can engage in vigorous exercise,...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Publication date: December 2019Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology, Volume 35, Issue 12Author(s): Sarah Cohen, Michelle Z. Gurvitz, Virginie Beauséjour-Ladouceur, Patrick R. Lawler, Judith Therrien, Ariane J. MarelliAbstractAs life expectancy in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) has improved, the risk for developing noncardiac morbidities is increasing in adult patients with CHD (ACHD). Among these noncardiac complications, malignancies significantly contribute to the disease burden of ACHD patients. Epidemiologic studies of cancer risk in CHD patients are challenging because they require large numbers...
Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Both low and high Hgb levels were associated with an increased risk of death from various causes, and some diseases showed different patterns according to sex. PMID: 31795616 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: J Prev Med Public Health Source Type: research
BOSTON (CBS) — Mammograms are routinely used to screen for breast cancer in women, but there’s mounting evidence that they may also help identify women at risk for heart disease. Mammograms don’t just detect breast tumors, but can also show calcium deposits in the arteries in the breasts, which has been linked to calcium deposits in the arteries in the heart. Calcium buildup in the coronary arteries is strongly associated with heart disease. Researchers at the University of California San Diego looked at nearly 300 women and found that those with calcified breast arteries were more than twice as likely to...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Health News Heart Disease Heart Failure Mammograms Source Type: news
Scientists from 22 institutions, including UCLA, are recommending early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of severe chronic inflammation to reduce the risk of chronic disease and death worldwide.The group of international experts, which also includes scientists from the National Institutes of Health, Stanford University, Harvard Medical School, Columbia University Medical Center and University College London, point to inflammation-related diseases as the cause of 50 percent of all deaths worldwide.Inflammation is a naturally occurring response by the body ’s immune system that helps fight illness and infection. Whe...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
(Natural News) Diet may not be the only consideration when it comes to staying healthy, but it does play a vital role in overall health. What you eat on a regular basis can help determine whether or not you will develop chronic conditions like diabetes, obesity or heart disease. Now, more support for this idea has...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Oncology Times - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: News Source Type: research
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