Q & A: How to have a guilt-free holiday dinner

The holidays are a time of merriment, often centered on food. While the energy during the festive season is at a high, for health-conscious folks it can create unneeded stress around personal food consumption.Erin Morse, chief clinical dietitian at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, shares how to remove the guilt from eating delicious meals, and how holiday partygoers can honor their bodies, feelings and traditions through a practice called intuitive eating. Studies have found that intuitive eaters have a lower body mass index, or BMI, better cholesterol and triglyceride levels, take more pleasure in their eating, and eat a healthier diet than those who do not eat intuitively.What is intuitive eating?Developed in 1995 by two registered dietitians, Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch, intuitive eating is an evidence-based eating philosophy  that promotes a healthy attitude toward food and body image. The foundation of intuitive eating ditches diet culture — eat when you are hungry, stop when you are full, eat foods that truly satisfy, and manage emotions without using food. When we choose food based on flavor, taste, texture, arom a, and not based on fat grams or calories, the eating experience is more satisfying, and we are actually likely to eat less food in the end.How can we practically apply the practice of intuitive eating at the holiday table?It is a personal journey and no two people will experience intuitive eating the same. Intuitive eating is set up as10 differen...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news