US life expectancy is still on the decline. Here's why

Life expectancy at birth -- the average length of time that you are expected to live -- continues to drop for Americans, a new study finds. Drug overdoses, suicides, alcohol-related illnesses and obesity are largely to blame.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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ConclusionBreast pilonidal sinus is an extremely rare variant of the condition. It should be suspected on clinical examination. Surgical excision is the definitive treatment strategy.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionGiven the increasing number of such surgeries performed the recognition of acute and chronic complications, and their optimal management is of great importance. Although performing a Roux-en-Y fistulojejunostomy was recommended in the literature, conservative and endoscopic treatment should be considered before.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 December 2019Source: Cirugía Española (English Edition)Author(s): Jaime Ruiz-Tovar, Raquel Sanchez-Santos, Ester Martín-García-Almenta, Esther García Villabona, Artur Marc Hernandez, Alberto Hernández-Matías, José Manuel Ramírez, Grupo de Trabajo de Cirugía Bariátrica del Grupo Español de Rehabilitación Multimodal (GERM)AbstractEnhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols are care programs based on scientific evidence and focused on postoperative recovery. They encompass all aspects of patient...
Source: Cirugia Espanola - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
This is not new news, but it's strong confirmation of earlier observations that have been somewhat controversial, and also bad news that the trend is continuing.That trend is declining life expectancy in the U.S. I'm not linking to the full report in JAMA because it's incredibly wonky and behind a paywall anyway, but rather to the associated editorial, which tells you what you need to know.Before we get into the substance of this, let me explain the concept of life expectancy. I'll try to put this simply, but some people find it confusing. It's really a fictitious, though useful, construct. It isn't really a prediction of ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
Life expectancy among people living in the United States has fallen in recent years, driven in part by an uptick in deaths among young and middle-aged adults from drug overdose, alcohol consumption, and suicide, according to areport published today inJAMA.“The implications of increasing midlife mortality are broad, affecting working-age adults and thus employers, the economy, health care, and national security. The trends also affect children, whose parents are more likely to die in midlife and whose own health could be at risk when they reach that age, or sooner,” wrote Steven Woolf, M.D., M.P.H., and Heidi Sc...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: alcohol CDC drug overdose Heidi Schoomaker Howard K. Koh JAMA Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 middle-aged adults Steven Woolf suicide U.S. life expectancy young adults Source Type: research
U.S. life expectancy has decreased for the second year in a row, and an editorial in the BMJ points to three contributing factors: drugs, alcohol and suicides, particularly among middle-age white Americans and those living in rural communities. The authors of the paper paint a bleak picture of the problems facing much of the United States today, but the authors say that policies that bolster the middle-class can help reverse the trend. The recent drop in life expectancy is alarming, the editorial states, “because life expectancy has risen for much of the past century in developed countries, including in the U.S.&rdqu...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
By JEFF GOLDSMITH Donald Trump’s stunning upset victory has occasioned a lot of searching among political analysts for an underlying explanation for the unexpected turn in voter sentiment. Many point to Trump’s galvanizing support among white working class and middle income Americans in economically depressed regions of the US- particularly Appalachia and the upper middle west “Rust Belt” – as the main factor that put him in office. While the Democrats concentrated on the so-called “coalition of the ascendant”- voter groups like Hispanics and Millennials that are growing, Trump ro...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
The news that mortality is increasing among middle-aged white Americans spread like wildfire last week (see here and here and here) thanks to a study by Anne Case and Angus Deaton, who recently won the Nobel Prize in Economics. As researchers who study the social determinants of health, we were very pleased to see such widespread interest in this urgent national problem. Unfortunately, there are a couple of pieces of the puzzle that we think the Case and Deaton study missed. By not looking at men and women separately, Case and Deaton failed to see that rising mortality is especially pronounced among women. The au...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Equity and Disparities Featured Population Health Public Health alcohol abuse drug abuse low-income women mortality rates safety net programs Social Determinants of Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
ConclusionThe headlines make this sound like an alarming study. However, there are reasons to be cautious about applying these results to UK patients. The majority of people (98%) in the study had gastric bypass surgery. The rest had intestinal bypass surgery or sleeve gastrectomy. None had gastric band surgery, which is a reversible operation (although still serious). In the UK, gastric bypass surgery makes up approximately half of all weight loss surgery, followed by gastric band and sleeve gastrectomy, which each account for about one quarter of all surgery. We don’t know whether the results of this study app...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Mental health Obesity Source Type: news
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