“Double Lumen” Esophagus: A Striking Endoscopic Finding.

We present a 45-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of multiple sclerosis who presented to the hospital with 4 weeks of epigastric pain, nausea, intermittent bilious emesis, and new jaundice. She reported daily intake of 2 –3 glasses of wine over the past 15 years. She denied recent travel or use of acetaminophen, herbal supplements, or any new medications. Laboratory results showed hemoglobin of 11.6 g/dL, white blood cell count of 16.0 × 103/μL, and a platelet count of 272 × 103/μL.
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Clinical Challenges and Images in GI Source Type: research

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We describe the most highly recommended generic and disease-specific PRO tools in SCD and discuss the challenges of incorporating them in clinical practice. EXPERT OPINION: PRO measures are essential to incorporate into SCD clinical trials either as primary or secondary outcomes. The use of PRO measures in SCD facilitates a patient-centered approach, which is likely to lead to improved outcomes. Significant challenges remain in adapting PRO tools to routine clinical use and in developing countries. PMID: 33034214 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Expert Review of Hematology - Category: Hematology Tags: Expert Rev Hematol Source Type: research
Currently in fellowship doing bread/butter procedures (MBB, epidurals, PNB, few SCS/PNS trials, etc.) and just interviewed at a private practice spot where they do a lot of procedures that I will have not done any training in prior to graduating (e.g. IT pump, SI fusion, Vertiflex, Kypho, MILD, Discectomy, lots of SCS/PNS trials etc) and significant amount of "OR pain procedures" at a very busy practice seeing 30-40 pts/day - how many of you are commonly performing these procedures and are... private practice concern
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Pain Medicine Source Type: forums
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related DisordersAuthor(s): Brenda Bertado-Cortés, Claudia Venzor-Mendoza, Daniel Rubio-Ordoñez, José Renán Pérez-Pérez, Lucy Andrea Novelo-Manzano, Lyda Viviana Villamil-Osorio, María de Jesús Jiménez-Ortega, María de la Luz Villalpando-Gueich, Nayeli Alejandra Sánchez-Rosales, Verónica García-Talavera
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: October 2020Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, Volume 89Author(s): Fernando Lopes, Fernando A. Vicentini, Nina L. Cluny, Alexander J. Mathews, Benjamin H. Lee, Wagdi A. Almishri, Lateece Griffin, William Gonçalves, Vanessa Pinho, Derek M. McKay, Simon A. Hirota, Mark G. Swain, Quentin J. Pittman, Keith A. Sharkey
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
BEST supplements to relieve joint pain: Is your arthritis playing up? The wetter and colder months could partially be to blame. These two pills may help.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Authors: Kim H, Lim YM, Lee EJ, Kim HW, Ahn HS, Kim KK PMID: 33029979 [PubMed]
Source: Journal of Clinical Neurology - Category: Neurology Tags: J Clin Neurol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: More than half of the iIONP patients had an enhanced oculomotor nerve in MRI. A few of them also had elevated CSF IgG synthesis rate, but no further evidence for inflammation was found. The administration of steroids seemed to have no benefit other than increasing the blood glucose level. PMID: 33029972 [PubMed]
Source: Journal of Clinical Neurology - Category: Neurology Tags: J Clin Neurol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Paramagnetic rims might be a characteristic MRI finding for MS, and therefore they have potential as an imaging marker for differentially diagnosing MS from NMOSD using 3-T MRI. PMID: 33029961 [PubMed]
Source: Journal of Clinical Neurology - Category: Neurology Tags: J Clin Neurol Source Type: research
We present a 45-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of multiple sclerosis who presented to the hospital with 4 weeks of epigastric pain, nausea, intermittent bilious emesis, and new jaundice. She reported daily intake of 2 –3 glasses of wine over the past 15 years. She denied recent travel or use of acetaminophen, herbal supplements, or any new medications. Laboratory results showed hemoglobin of 11.6 g/dL, white blood cell count of 16.0 × 103/μL, and a platelet count of 272 × 103/μL.
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Clinical Challenges and Images in GI Source Type: research
Conclusions The hepatitis B vaccination program targeting newborns and infants does NOT make sense. The vaccination itself has not proven to be effective in preventing hepatitis B. There is very little risk of children becoming infected with hepatitis B. Hepatitis B is a disease that is not highly infectious and tends to affect adults in high risk groups. The course of the disease is usually self-limiting with lifelong immunity acquired. In contrast, many serious health consequences have resulted from the hepatitis B vaccination, including permanent disability and death.   References http://www.nvic.org/nvic-archives...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Top Stories adverse reactions Hepatitis B vaccine truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs
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