Naturally-derived chronobiotics in chrononutrition

Publication date: Available online 23 November 2019Source: Trends in Food Science &TechnologyAuthor(s): Elisa Dufoo-Hurtado, Abraham Wall-Medrano, Rocio Campos-VegaAbstractBackgroundThe circadian clock is an evolved autonomous timekeeping system that aligns body functions to the solar course, by anticipating/coordinating the required metabolic activities; such internal clock responds to several exogenous stimuli (Zeitgebers) able to synchronize the endogenous rhythm. A disrupted circadian rhythm leads to several neurodegenerative and metabolic illness such as obesity, diabetes, and psychiatric disorders.Scope and approachCircadian rhythm disorders have no current medical treatment, but chrononutrition has emerged as an important tool to enhance metabolic and nutritional health in sleep disorders. This review highlights the effects of meal timing, food types, nutrients and several bioactive xenobiotic compounds (chronobiotics) on circadian clocks. The potential application of diet therapies is discussed particularly to deal with certain metabolic disorders related to circadian misalignment.Key findings and conclusions: The desynchronization of circadian rhythms negatively influences health necessitating the development of molecular modulators of circadian rhythms including food components, meal timing, or different diet types that can help correct circadian disorders attenuating the burden of chronic diseases. However, there is limited research on the chronobiotic effect o...
Source: Trends in Food Science and Technology - Category: Food Science Source Type: research

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