Benefits of a municipality tuberculosis screening program among socially vulnerable citizens

Conclusions: TB screening among socially vulnerable citizens is feasible and can identify TB thereby possibly reducing its spread. Future TB screening should primarily focus on sputum analysis. Identification of comorbidities resulted in additional investigations and early diagnosis of e.g. cancer.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Tuberculosis Source Type: research

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Authors: Mascitti M, Togni L, Rubini C, Troiano G, Lo Muzio L, Santarelli A Abstract Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common head and neck malignancy, characterised by high invasive capacity, lymph node metastasis, and high recurrence rate. Among the morphological features of oral cancer, the tumour-associated tissue eosinophilia has gained growing interest in the last years. Eosinophils are a minor subpopulation of leukocytes, representing 1-3% of all circulating white blood cells. The presence of high levels of eosinophils is associated with several diseases, but their role in cancer pathophysiology is co...
Source: Histology and Histopathology - Category: Cytology Tags: Histol Histopathol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Vaccine-related anaphylaxis seems to have been very rare in the past, but health care professionals must always be aware of anaphylaxis. PMID: 32989932 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Korean Medical Science - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: J Korean Med Sci Source Type: research
By SAURABH JHA, MD Slumdog TB No one knows who gave Rahul Roy tuberculosis. Roy’s charmed life as a successful trader involved traveling in his Mercedes C class between his apartment on the plush Nepean Sea Road in South Mumbai and offices in Bombay Stock Exchange. He cared little for Mumbai’s weather. He seldom rolled down his car windows – his ambient atmosphere, optimized for his comfort, rarely changed. Historically TB, or “consumption” as it was known, was a Bohemian malady; the chronic suffering produced a rhapsody which produced fine art. TB was fashionable in Victorian Britain...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence Health Tech Saurabh Jha TB tuberculosis Source Type: blogs
Discussion Facial nerve palsy has been known for centuries, but in 1821 unilateral facial nerve paralysis was described by Sir Charles Bell. Bell’s palsy (BP) is a unilateral, acute facial paralysis that is clinically diagnosed after other etiologies have been excluded by appropriate history, physical examination and/or laboratory testing or imaging. Symptoms include abnormal movement of facial nerve. It can be associated with changes in facial sensation, hearing, taste or excessive tearing. The right and left sides are equally affected but bilateral BP is rare (0.3%). Paralysis can be complete or incomplete at prese...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Conclusion: Clinical features of TB in older patients may be atypical and confused with age-related diseases. Extensive pulmonary tuberculosis was often found in this group of patients.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Tuberculosis Source Type: research
By SAURABH JHA Of my time arguing with doctors, 30 % is spent convincing British doctors that their American counterparts aren’t idiots, 30 % convincing American doctors that British doctors aren’t idiots, and 40 % convincing both that I’m not an idiot. A British doctor once earnestly asked whether American physicians carry credit card reading machines inside their white coats. Myths about the NHS can be equally comical. British doctors don’t prostate every morning in deference to the NHS, like the citizens of Oceania sang to Big Brother in Orwell’s dystopia. Nor, in their daily rounds, do the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: OP-ED Uncategorized AlfieEvans Source Type: blogs
Leptadenia reticulata (Retz.) Wight& Arn. (Apocynaceae), is a traditional medicinal plant species widely used to treat various ailments such as tuberculosis, hematopoiesis, emaciation, cough, dyspnea, fever, burning sensation, night blindness, cancer, and dysentery. In Ayurveda, it is known for its revitalizing, rejuvenating, and lactogenic properties. This plant is one of the major ingredients in many commercial herbal formulations, including Speman, Envirocare, Calshakti, Antisept, and Chyawanprash. The therapeutic potential of this herb is because of the presence of diverse bioactive compounds such as α-amyrin...
Source: Molecules - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
​BY MARGARET MARY S. LANDEL, DO; &CARLA DUGAS, DOA 59-year-old otherwise healthy man presented with an upper respiratory illness of four weeks' duration. His initial presentation to his primary care physician one month prior included a nonproductive cough and low-grade fever, which lasted approximately two weeks until his internist ordered a chest x-ray. That showed a 3 cm well-circumscribed right lower lobe lesion, and was followed by a contrast enhanced chest CT. The chest CT was concerning for pulmonary neoplasm, and he received an interventional radiology-guided biopsy of the lesion. Results were still pending at...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
Do you know someone who should have seen a doctor years ago? Maybe it’s your husband, or your father, or your brother, even your son? They complain about the shortness of breath, the nagging cough, or the stomach pain. But they never take action. For some men, so decisive at work or within the family circle, the lack of motivation to get an illness or symptom checked out is surprising. In fact, men are 24% less likely to have visited a doctor in the past year than women. Seeing a doctor is scary and it makes them feel weak and out of control. Roald Bradstock was one of those men. An Olympic athlete who trained 3 to 4...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Men's Health Source Type: blogs
Do you know someone who should have seen a doctor years ago? Maybe it’s your husband, or your father, or your brother, even your son? They complain about the shortness of breath, the nagging cough, or the stomach pain. But they never take action. For some men, so decisive at work or within the family circle, the lack of motivation to get an illness or symptom checked out is surprising. In fact, men are 24% less likely to have visited a doctor in the past year than women. Seeing a doctor is scary and it makes them feel weak and out of control. Roald Bradstock was one of those men. An Olympic athlete who trained 3 to 4...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Men's Health Source Type: blogs
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