The functional role of IgE to staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins in severe asthma

Conclusions: Our study suggest the functional activity of IgE to SEs in severe asthmatic patients. These results can be clinically relevant in patients not sensitized to perennial allergens who can be candidates to anti-IgE therapy.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Allergy and immunology Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: Our results did not show that S. aureus found in nasal mucosa membrane is significantly different in patients with or without NP. However, association of the presence of S. aureus in patients with nasal polyposis with asthma, allergy and inflammation has been shown. PMID: 31785225 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Neuroendocrinology Letters - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Neuro Endocrinol Lett Source Type: research
Conclusion: PMBL improves the clinical course of SAR in school-aged children. However, this effect has not been shown to be related to the ability of PMBL to decolonize MRSA from the nose.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Paediatric asthma and allergy Source Type: research
We present a 23-year-old male with a history of cystic fibrosis (CF) with associated renal disease, bronchiectasis, pneumothorax, and distal intestinal obstruction syndrome admitted for CF exacerbation. Sputum culture was positive for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Chest imaging revealed extensive opacities in the left lung. His FEV1 during admission was 52% (baseline 70%). Allergy was consulted as inhaled vancomycin therapy was preferred, but the patient had previous vancomycin-induced reactions.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion For the first time, this study shows that being sensitised to SEs is associated with an increased subsequent risk of severe asthma and asthma exacerbations.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Asthma and allergy Original Articles: Asthma Source Type: research
Authors: Kim J, Kim BE, Ahn K, Leung DYM Abstract Staphylococcus aureus commonly colonizes the skin of atopic dermatitis (AD) patients and contributes to the development and exacerbation of AD. Multiple factors are associated with colonization of AD skin by S. aureus, including the strength of S. aureus-corneocyte adhesion, deficiency of antimicrobial peptides, decreased levels of filaggrin and filaggrin degradation products, overexpressed Th2/Th17 cytokines, microbial dysbiosis and altered lipid profiles. S. aureus colonization on AD skin causes skin barrier dysfunction through virulence factors such as superantig...
Source: Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Allergy Asthma Immunol Res Source Type: research
Staphylococcus aureus has been implicated in the pathophysiology of eczema, allergic rhinitis, asthma, and food allergy. S aureus is a marker of more severe eczema, which is a risk factor for food sensitization/allergy. Therefore it might be that the association between S aureus and food allergy in eczematous patients is related to eczema severity.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Knowledge of the skin microbiome has improved in recent years. This will certainly improve the understanding of the pathogenesis causing atopic eczema. These findings may also form the foundation of new treatment and prevention strategies for atopic eczema in the future. PMID: 31111169 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Der Hautarzt: Zeitschrift fur Dermatologie, Venerologie, und verwandte Gebiete - Category: Dermatology Tags: Hautarzt Source Type: research
Conclusions In conclusion, articles in this Research Topic made a very significant contribution to our understanding of the role played by environmental factors, dysbiotic conditions, and infections in triggering diseases. Since this is a rapidly expanding area of research, many other factors contributing to the onset of these diseases are not covered here. We are confident, however, that further studies will expand the list as well as bring a better understanding of mechanisms involved in the onset of autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. Author Contributions All authors listed have made a substantial, direct and i...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In this study we found blocking autophagy led to increased CP growth in both macrophages and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In vivo, loss of the autophagy elongation component ATG16L1 specifically in myeloid cells led to increased mortality in response to CP infection, characterized by greater numbers of neutrophils and dendritic cells, but no change in the CP burden in the lungs. This was accompanied by an increase in inflammasome-active macrophages and IL-1β production. While induction of autophagy in macrophages led to reduced CP growth in vitro, in vivo treatment with rapamycin led to increased mortality of infected...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Discussion There are numerous microbial communities inhabited in the human body, which is critical to human health. The relationship between human microbiome and diseases received much attention from both medical and bioinformatics community recently. However, traditional methods to detect their association is costly and labor-intensive. Thus, we proposed here a new computational model called NBLPIHMDA to infer potential microbe-disease associations. NBLPIHMDA first combined known microbe-disease associations in HMDAD and the Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity to construct disease similarity network and microb...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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