Harvard Health Ad Watch: A fibromyalgia treatment ( “But you look so good!”)

It’s something I’ve heard countless times from patients with fibromyalgia. They’re telling a friend or family member about their condition and the response is, “But you don’t look sick” or “But you look so well.” Sometimes, the reaction is more of an eye roll or some other response that reflects skepticism that the problem is even “real.” Those are issues addressed head-on in a TV ad for Lyrica (pregabalin), a treatment for fibromyalgia. “To most people, I look like most people,” a woman says. “But on the inside I feel chronic, widespread pain.” After clarifying that the pain is real, this direct-to-consumer drug advertisement moves on to say one of the current theories about the origin of pain in fibromyalgia is that it’s “thought to be caused by overactive nerves.” The mood of the ad is somber at first. Sad music serves as backdrop to a woman who is clearly suffering as a man — perhaps her husband? — plays in the park with two adorable kids. That all changes when she talks about taking Lyrica. Then the music soars and the voiceover tells us that “Lyrica is believed to calm these nerves.” The now-smiling woman looks into the camera and pronounces, “I’m glad my doctor prescribed Lyrica.” The scene brightens and she’s smiling as she goes about setting up for a neighborhood block party. The voiceover informs us that, “For so...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Arthritis Bones and joints Fatigue Pain Management Source Type: blogs

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Publication date: Available online 17 July 2019Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical RheumatologyAuthor(s): Sizheng Steven Zhao, Stephen J. Duffield, Nicola J. GoodsonAbstractFibromyalgia (FM) is one of the most common conditions that rheumatologists encounter. It is characterised by chronic widespread pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances and impaired cognition. The prevalence of comorbid FM among populations with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are considerably higher than among the general population, with pooled prevalence estimates of 18–24% in RA, 14&n...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
Conclusion: These findings support the hypothesis that in FM a deteriorated function of cortical inhibition, indexed by a higher SICI parameter, a lower function of the DPMS, together with a higher level of BDNF indicate that FM has different pathological substrates from depression. They suggest that an up-regulation phenomenon of intracortical inhibitory networks associated with a disruption of the DPMS function occurs in FM. Introduction Major depressive disorder (MDD) and fibromyalgia (FM) present overlapped symptoms. Although the connection between these two disorders has not been elucidated yet, the disruption...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: At the moment, ozone therapy seems a treatment that, also because without any side effect, is possible to be proposed to patients with fibromyalgia that are not obtaining adequate results from other available treatments and it can be considered as complementary/integrative medicine. PMID: 30840304 [PubMed - in process]
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
The cell phone blares out reveille. Your eyes open reluctantly and you realize it’s morning, having only gone to bed four hours earlier because of a late-night party. You creak out of bed to ready yourself for work, arthritic joints hurting much more than usual. A painful day lies ahead even after taking ibuprofen. Does this sound familiar? If it does, you are not alone. Nearly 70% of Americans report getting insufficient sleep on a regular basis, and approximately 20% of Americans suffer from chronic pain. Recently, the intersection between these two conditions has become more apparent. The association between sleep...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Pain Management Sleep Source Type: blogs
Our definitions of pain matter more to researchers and people who like to philosophise about pain than to people experiencing pain. At the same time, definitions do matter because when the IASP definition of pain was first established, the distinction between the neurobiological underpinnings of pain – and the experience – was clear. And this matters because neurobiology is only part of the picture. (Chekka &Benzon, 2018; Cohen, Quintner &van Rysewyk, 2018; Reuter, Sienhold &Sytsma, 2018; Tesarz &Eich, 2017; Williams &Craig, 2016)The idea of “tribes” in pain and pain management i...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Pain conditions Professional topics diagnosis Education interprofessional lived experience silos social sociology tribes Source Type: blogs
Neurostimulation has the capacity to stop pain signals from traveling up to the brain, but to mask the pain effectively and for long periods of time clinicians have turned to implants. That is because conventional TENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerv...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Medicine Orthopedic Surgery Pain Management Source Type: blogs
View Original Article Here: Tai Chi For Seniors: Exercises, Benefits, and Tips For The Elderly Tai chi, a form of Chinese martial arts that focuses on slow, controlled movements. It’s low impact and gives people with limited mobility a chance to improve their balance, range of motion and coordination. Research shows that tai chi for seniors can reduce the incidence of falls in elderly and at-risk adults by about 43 percent. With fewer than 34 percent of aging adults getting enough exercise, it’s important for caregivers, older individuals and people who work with seniors to know about this gentle but effective ...
Source: Shield My Senior - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Senior Safety Source Type: blogs
Authors: Clauw DJ, D'Arcy Y, Gebke K, Semel D, Pauer L, Jones KD Abstract Fibromyalgia (FM) is a complex chronic disease that affects 3-10% of the general adult population and is principally characterized by widespread pain, and is often associated with disrupted sleep, fatigue, and comorbidities, among other symptoms. There are many gaps in our knowledge of FM, such that, compared with other chronic illnesses including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma, it is far behind in terms of provider understanding and therapeutic approaches. The experience that healthcare professionals (HCPs) historically gained in...
Source: Postgraduate Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Postgrad Med Source Type: research
ConclusionThis large‐scale study demonstrates that regardless of the pain definition used, the magnitude of association between pain and other associated symptoms of fibromyalgia is similar. This finding supports the continued collection of both when classifying fibromyalgia, but highlights the fact that pain may not require to follow the definition outlined within the 1990 American College of Rheumatology criteria.
Source: Arthritis Care and Research - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
It seems odd to me that there’s much argument about central sensitisation in pain circles. I thought the idea of central sensitisation was well-established based on research from some years ago – but apparently there are still arguments about its relevance, and lots of debate about how to identify it clinically. This post is based mainly on a presentation by Jo Nijs from Pain in Motion, at the recent NZ Pain Society meeting in Nelson. In this post I want to briefly review the material presented by Jo suggesting that central sensitisation is a thing. I’ll write more about assessment in a future blog, or th...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Pain conditions Research Science in practice biopsychosocial Health Source Type: blogs
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