IJERPH, Vol. 16, Pages 4638: Exit and Entry Screening Practices for Infectious Diseases among Travelers at Points of Entry: Looking for Evidence on Public Health Impact

IJERPH, Vol. 16, Pages 4638: Exit and Entry Screening Practices for Infectious Diseases among Travelers at Points of Entry: Looking for Evidence on Public Health Impact International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph16234638 Authors: Mouchtouri Christoforidou an der Heiden Lemos Fanos Rexroth Grote Belfroid Swaan Hadjichristodoulou A scoping search and a systematic literature review were conducted to give an insight on entry and exit screening referring to travelers at points of entry, by analyzing published evidence on practices, guidelines, and experiences in the past 15 years worldwide. Grey literature, PubMed. and Scopus were searched using specific terms. Most of the available data identified through the systematic literature review concerned entry screening measures at airports. Little evidence is available about entry and exit screening measure implementation and effectiveness at ports and ground crossings. Exit screening was part of the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) temporary recommendations for implementation in certain points of entry, for specific time periods. Exit screening measures for Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in the three most affected West African countries did not identify any cases and showed zero sensitivity and very low specificity. The percentages of confirmed cases identified out of the total numbers of travelers that passed through entry screening measures in variou...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research

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(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news
Editor’s Note: This post reflects on a speech on pandemic preparedness Dr. Fauci gave on January 10, 2017 in Washington, DC, hosted by  The Center for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University Medical Center, the Harvard Global Health Institute, and Health Affairs. One of the most important challenges facing the new Administration is preparedness for the pandemic outbreak of an infectious disease. Infectious diseases will continue to pose a significant threat to public health and the economies of countries worldwide. The U.S. government will need to continue its investment to combat these ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Featured Global Health Policy Ebola HIV/AIDS NIH pandemic preparedness Zika Source Type: blogs
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
With cases rising in Florida, Singapore, Vietnam and Trinidad and Tobago, the Zika virus pandemic is raising public concern in regions across the globe, including the U.S., where about 80 percent of Americans are aware of it but only 40 percent understand how it is actually transmitted. This raises a host of questions not only about the clinical and epidemiological scope of the outbreak, but also about the ability of citizens, public health authorities and politicians at all levels to adequately deal with it.  So far, the response has been slow and the challenge remains serious and unpredictable. We need to understand...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
This study assumed that the rate of imported Zika cases over time in U.S. locations would be proportional to the number of flights from Zika-affected areas. We tested this with univariate Gaussian general linear models (GLMs) by regressing imported Zika cases against FLIRT’s estimates. We ran these models on all permutations for FLIRT prediction type (one-degree connectedness and multi-degree simulation), time period (restricted to early data and all data), and aggregation level (state and airport region). Before running GLMs, all input variables were standardized by dividing by twice the standard deviation.15 To o...
Source: PLOS Currents Outbreaks - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion The use of telemedicine in epidemic situations has a high potential in improving epidemiological investigations, disease control, and clinical case management. However, since it is a recent application, further research would be needed to gain an improved understanding of how telemedicine could be applied in epidemic situations.
Source: European Research in Telemedicine - Category: Information Technology Source Type: research
This article reviews the evidence and characteristics of some of the accepted (tuberculosis, measles, chickenpox, whooping cough) and some of the more opportunistic (influenza, Clostridium difficile, norovirus) aerosol-transmitted infectious agents and outlines methods of detecting and quantifying transmission.
Source: Current Treatment Options in Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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Source: PLOS Currents Disasters - Category: Global & Universal Authors: Source Type: research
Do you know what infectious disease you're supposed to be the most worried about today? Is it the "superbug" that broke out in an LA hospital last month, possibly exposing over a hundred patients? Or is it the early seasonal uptick in cases of Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in Saudi Arabia that has the global epidemiological community buzzing? Or maybe it's the continuation of measles outbreaks all over the country due to spotty immunization coverage. You might also still be reasonably concerned about Ebola (and no, it's not over yet, despite a downturn in news coverage and an encouraging slowdown in ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In the past decade, the H1N1 virus and Ebola are just two of the diseases whose spread was spurred by international airline travel. Screening passengers at airports, therefore, could be one key method for slowing the global spread of infectious diseases. And although a team lead by UCLA researchers has found that airport screening misses at least half of infected travelers, the scientists say that rate could be improved. Their research was published in eLife, a highly regarded open-access online science journal. The life scientists used a mathematical model to analyze screening for six viruses: the SARS coronavirus, the Eb...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
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