Infants more vulnerable to measles than previously thought: study

Infants are more vulnerable to measles infection than previously thought, a new study suggests. The findings debunk notions that most babies are protected for much of their first year by maternal antibodies passed on through pregnancy.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

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Vertical transmission of viral infections during pregnancy are major causes of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The clinical manifestations vary depending on the viral agent and the gestational age of pregnancy at infection. A viral infection in the first two trimesters of pregnancy can lead to congenital malformation or fetal death (MMWR 2001; Tan and Koren 2006; Ornoy and Ergaz 2017). Viral infection towards the end of the pregnancy can lead to preterm birth or neonatal morbidity and mortality (Brown et al.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Rubella, sometimes known as German measles, is an infectious disease caused by the rubella virus, generally involving a mild febrile disease accompanied by rash and lymphadenopathy (Menser et al., 1978; Lambert et al., 2015). While rubella is mostly self-limiting and is asymptomatic for 25% –50% of infections, pregnant women infected in the first trimester can suffer a variety of complications, including miscarriage, stillbirth, and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) (Panagiotopoulos et al., 1999; Lambert et al., 2015).
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Ragusa R, Platania A, Cuccia M, Zappalà G, Giorgianni G, D'Agati P, Bellia MA, Marranzano M Abstract Measles is a highly contagious airborne disease. Unvaccinated pregnant women are not only at risk of infection but also at risk of severe pregnancy complications. As measles causes a dysregulation of the entire immune system, we describe immunological variations and how immune response mechanisms can lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes. We evaluated data during the measles outbreak reported in the province of Catania, Italy, from May 2017 to June 2018. We controlled hospital discharge records for pati...
Source: Journal of Pregnancy - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Pregnancy Source Type: research
ConclusionsCOVID-19 has become an everyday topic of discussion throughout the world, indicating the increasing number of COVID-19 cases, deaths and recoveries. The lessons learned from past pandemics such as social distancing, wearing masks, avoiding public gatherings and adherence to guidelines, along with personal hygiene, are the key measures that must be taken in order to live with COVID-19. Precautions for the elderly and pregnant women advised by medical authorities are to be strictly adhered to. These will help in reducing COVID-19 cases and in turn will reduce the pressure on hospitals to serve those in need. India...
Source: Journal of Public Health - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
Conclusion Approximately one of every four pregnant patients is serologically measles nonimmune, even among women with documented MMR vaccination or documented rubella immunity. These findings raise concerns that relying on vaccination history or rubella immune status may not be sufficient to assure protection from infection with measles. If further suggests that measles serology should be added to routine prenatal laboratory testing to identify nonimmune patients that may benefit from postpartum vaccination. Key Points [...] Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme...
Source: American Journal of Perinatology - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: SMFM Fellowship Series Article Source Type: research
This report summarizes progress toward rubella elimination and CRS prevention in WPR during 2000-2019. Coverage with a first dose of rubella-containing vaccine (RCV1) increased from 11% in 2000 to 96% in 2019. During 1970-2019, approximately 84 million persons were vaccinated through 62 supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) conducted in 27 countries. Reported rubella incidence increased from 35.5 to 71.3 cases per million population among reporting countries during 2000-2008, decreased to 2.1 in 2017, and then increased to 18.4 in 2019 as a result of outbreaks in China and Japan. Strong sustainable immunization prog...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
Editorial advocates for routine vaccination of pregnant women and children remaining a priority during the covid-19 pandemic response, highlighting that outbreaks of measles and other vaccine preventable diseases is possible if uptake of routine vaccinations falls.
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Source Type: research
New evidence published in the Cochrane Library today finds MMR, MMRV and MMR+V vaccines are effective and that they are not associated with increased risk of autism. Measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (also known as chickenpox) are infectious diseases caused by viruses. They are most common in children and young adults, and can lead to potentially fatal illnesses, disabilities and death. Measles remains one of the leading causes of childhood death around the globe. Rubella is also dangerous for pregnant women, as it can cause miscarriage or harm to unborn babies. The MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) is a combined...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: news
Right now, many people are hoping for a vaccine to protect against the new coronavirus. While that’s still on the horizon, new research suggests that families who do vaccinate their children may not be following the recommended schedule. Vaccines are given on a schedule for a reason: to protect children from vaccine-preventable disease. Experts designed the schedule so that children get protection when they need it — and the doses are timed so the vaccine itself can have the best effect. When parents don’t follow the schedule, their children may not be protected. And yet, many parents do not follow the sc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
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