Elevating acetyl-CoA levels reduces aspects of brain aging

Because old age is the greatest risk factor for dementia, a successful therapy will require an understanding of the physiological changes that occur in the brain with aging. Here, two structurally distinct Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug candidates, CMS121 and J147, were used to identify a unique molecular pathway that is shared between the aging brain and AD. CMS121 and J147 reduced cognitive decline as well as metabolic and transcriptional markers of aging in the brain when administered to rapidly aging SAMP8 mice. Both compounds preserved mitochondrial homeostasis by regulating acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) metabolism. CMS121 and J147 increased the levels of acetyl-CoA in cell culture and mice via the inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1), resulting in neuroprotection and increased acetylation of histone H3K9 in SAMP8 mice, a site linked to memory enhancement. These data show that targeting specific metabolic aspects of the aging brain could result in treatments for dementia.
Source: eLife - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Neuroscience Source Type: research

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Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study demonstrates for the first time that senescent cells secrete functional LTs, significantly contributing to the LTs pool known to cause or exacerbate idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Against Senolytics https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/against-senolytics/ There is no consensus in science that is so strong as to have no heretics. So here we have an interview with a naysayer on the matter of senolytic treatments, who argues that the loss of senescent cells in aged tissues will cause more harm to long-term health than the damage they will do by remaining. To be clear, I think this to be a ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 31 October 2019Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Basis of DiseaseAuthor(s): Ju Gao, Luwen Wang, Chao Gao, Hiroyuki Arakawa, George Perry, Xinglong WangAbstractAlzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly, characterized clinically by progressive decline in cognitive function and neuropathologically by the presence of senile plaques and neuronal loss in the brain. While current drugs for AD are always employed as symptomatic therapies with variable benefits, there is no treatment to delay its progression or halt neurodegeneration. TAR DNA-bi...
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) Molecular Basis of Disease - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
In this study, the enhanced mice live somewhat longer than their unmodified peers, though not as much longer as is the case for the application of telomerase gene therapy. The mice do also exhibit reduced cancer risk, however. The scientists here class telomere shortening as a cause of aging, which is not a point universally agreed upon. Reductions in average telomere length in tissues looks much more like a downstream consequence of reduced stem cell activity than an independent mechanism. Researchers obtain the first mice born with hyper-long telomeres and show that it is possible to extend life without any geneti...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mixed dementia (MxD) comprise the majority of dementia cases in the growing global aging population. MxD describes the coexistence of AD pathology with vascular pathology, including cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Cardiovascular disease increases risk for AD and MxD, but mechanistic synergisms between the coexisting pathologies affecting dementia risk, progression and the ultimate clinical manifestations remain elusive. To explore the additive or synergistic interactions between AD and chronic hypertension, we developed a rat model of MxD, produced by breeding APPswe/PS1ΔE9 tra...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
AbstractNeurodegenerative diseases (NDs) result from progressive deterioration of selectively susceptible neuron populations in different central nervous system (CNS) regions. NDs are classified in accordance with the primary clinical manifestations (e.g., parkinsonism, dementia, or motor neuron disease), the anatomic basis of neurodegeneration (e.g., frontotemporal degenerations, extrapyramidal disorders, or spinocerebellar degenerations), and fundamental molecular abnormalities (e.g., mutations, mitochondrial dysfunction, and its related molecular alterations). NDs include the Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease, amo...
Source: BioFactors - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: REVIEW ARTICLE Source Type: research
Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly and, despite the tremendous efforts researchers have put into AD research, there are no effective options for prevention and treatment of the disease. The best way to reach this goal is to clarify the mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of AD. In the last few years the views about the drivers of AD have been changing and nowadays it is believed that neuroinflammation takes center stage in disease pathogenesis. Herein, we provide an overview about the role of neuroinflammation in AD describing the role of microglia and...
Source: Ageing Research Reviews - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Ageing Res Rev Source Type: research
Authors: Anila V, Mahalaxmi I, Venkatesh B, Balachandar V Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder is the leading cause of dementia in the world whose etiology is still unclear. AD was always related to aging though there have been instances where people at an early age also succumb to this disease. With medical advancements, the mortality rate has significantly reduced which also makes people more prone to AD. AD is rare, yet the prominent disease has been widely studied with several hypotheses trying to understand the workings of its onset. The most recent and popular hypothesis in AD is th...
Source: Acta Neuropsychiatrica - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Acta Neuropsychiatr Source Type: research
In this study, researchers studied 438,952 participants in the UK Biobank, who had a total of 24,980 major coronary events - defined as the first occurrence of non-fatal heart attack, ischaemic stroke, or death due to coronary heart disease. They used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to randomly divide the participants into groups, mimicking the effects of running a clinical trial. People with genes associated with lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, and a combination of both were put into different groups, and compared against those without thes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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