Record incidence of hantavirus disease

(Deutsches Aerzteblatt International) 2824 new cases of hantavirus disease were reported in Germany in 2012, the highest number ever in a single year. In the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International, Detlev Krüger and coauthors present the main facts about this disease.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

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J. Reynes et al.
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Martin J. Raftery, Mohammed O. Abdelaziz, J örg Hofmann, Günther Schönrich
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Source: ScienceNOW - Category: Science Authors: Tags: twis Source Type: news
November 21, 2018—(BRONX, NY)—Hantaviruses cause severe and sometimes fatal respiratory infections, but how they infect lung cells has been a mystery. In today’s issue of Nature, an international team including researchers atAlbert Einstein College of Medicine reports that hantaviruses gain entry to lung cells by“unlocking” a cell-surface receptor called protocadherin-1 (PCDH1). Deleting this receptor made lab animals highly resistant to infection. The findings show that targeting PCDH1 could be a useful strategy against deadlyhantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS).
Source: Einstein News - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
(US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases) A global team of investigators has identified a key protein involved in Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS), a serious and sometimes fatal respiratory disease, according to research published today in Nature. The cell-surface receptor protein protocadherin-1 (PCDH1), commonly associated with human asthma, is responsible for facilitating lung cell infection and triggering HPS. Discovery of the cellular receptor for hantaviruses allows for rational and logical drug and antibody design to prevent the virus from infecting lung tissue.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
(Albert Einstein College of Medicine) Hantaviruses cause severe and sometimes fatal respiratory infections, but how they infect lung cells has been a mystery. In today's issue of Nature, an international team including researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine reports that hantaviruses gain entry to lung cells by 'unlocking' a cell-surface receptor called protocadherin-1 (PCDH1). Deleting this receptor made lab animals highly resistant to infection. The findings show that targeting PCDH1 could be a useful strategy against deadly hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) A human protein associated with asthma is key to how hantaviruses infect the lungs and sometimes cause the life-threatening pulmonary condition hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), according to researchers supported by NIH. They say the most prevalent hantaviruses in North America (Sin Nombre virus) and South America (Andes virus) can recognize the protein, protocadherin-1 (PCDH1), and exploit it to infect the lungs. They hope that disrupting that recognition event could lead to a therapeutic against HPS.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
In this study, we screened 27 ANDV convalescent HCPS patient sera for their capacity to bind and neutralize ANDV in vitro. One patient who showed high neutralizing titer was selected to isolate ANDV–glycoprotein (GP) Abs. ANDV-GP–specific memory B cells were single cell sorted, and recombinant immunoglobulin G antibodies were cloned and produced. Two monoclonal Abs (mAbs), JL16 and MIB22, potently recognized ANDV-GPs and neutralized ANDV. We examined the post-exposure efficacy of these two mAbs as a monotherapy or in combination therapy in a Syrian hamster model of ANDV-induced HCPS, and both mAbs protected 100...
Source: Science Translational Medicine - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: Research Articles Source Type: research
Protocadherin-1 is essential for cell entry by New World hantaviruses, Published online: 21 November 2018; doi:10.1038/s41586-018-0702-1New World hantaviruses—which cause a severe human respiratory disease—use surface glycoproteins to bind to the human protocadherin-1 protein and enter endothelial cells in vitro; depleting protocadherin-1 in Syrian golden hamsters largely protects against disease.
Source: Nature AOP - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
Shu-Qing Zuo, Xiu-Jun Li, Zhi-Qiang Wang, Jia-Fu Jiang, Li-Qun Fang, Wen-Hui Zhang, Jiu-Song Zhang, Qiu-Min Zhao, Wu-Chun Cao
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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