At-a-glance - Cancer trends in Canada, 1984 to 2015.

At-a-glance - Cancer trends in Canada, 1984 to 2015. Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can. 2019 Nov;39(11):310-314 Authors: Demers AA, Brenner DR, Smith L, Shaw A Abstract Examining incidence trends of all cancers combined in order to understand cancer trends can be misleading, as patterns can vary across individual cancer types. This paper highlights findings on trends over time from Canadian Cancer Statistics 2019, as measured by the annual percent change (APC) of age-standardized incidence rates. Among the results were a recent increase in thyroid cancer in males (APC: 6.4%, 1997-2015), as well as decreases in prostate cancer (APC: -9.1%, 2011-2015) and cervical cancer (APC: -3.3%, 2010-2015). PMID: 31729314 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention in Canada - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can Source Type: research

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Conclusions: Patients with IPF had a higher risk for various types of cancer incidence compared to matched control cohort. Greater attention should be paid to cancer development and screening in patients with IPF.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias Source Type: research
Authors: Brenner DR, Ruan Y, Shaw E, O'Sullivan D, Poirier AE, Heer E, Villeneuve PJ, Walter SD, Friedenreich CM, Smith L, De P Abstract BACKGROUND: Although cancer incidence over time is well documented in Canada, trends by birth cohort and age group are less well known. We analyzed age- and sex-standardized incidence trends in Canada for 16 major cancer sites and all cancers combined. METHODS: We obtained nationally representative population-based cancer incidence data in Canada between 1971 and 2015 from the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System (1969-1992) and the Canadian Cancer Registry (1992-2015). ...
Source: Canadian Medical Association Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: CMAJ Source Type: research
Abstract AP-1 is a dimeric complex that is composed of JUN, FOS, ATF and MAF protein families. FOS-related antigen 1 (FRA1) which encoded by FOSL1 gene, belongs to the FOS protein family, and mainly forms an AP-1 complex with the protein of the JUN family to exert an effect. Regulation of FRA1 occurs at levels of transcription and post-translational modification, and phosphorylation is the major post-translational modification. FRA1 is mainly regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling pathway and is degraded by ubiquitin-independent proteasomes. FRA1 can affect biological functions, such as tumor...
Source: Molecular Biology Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Mol Biol Rep Source Type: research
Purpose of review Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have altered incidences of certain malignancies as compared with the general population. This review summarizes the recent literature on risk of malignancy in SLE and proposed mechanisms for these altered susceptibilities. Recent findings Recent studies have confirmed previous data showing an increased risk of hematological, lung, thyroid, liver, cervical and vulvovaginal cancers, while demonstrating a decreased risk of breast and prostate cancer. Lymphomagenesis in SLE has been linked to increased activity of multiple inflammatory cytokines as well as...
Source: Current Opinion in Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS AND SJÖGREN SYNDROME: Edited by Mariana Kaplan Source Type: research
Conclusion MTDH is pro-oncogenic factor playing multifaceted and diverse roles in cancer progression. Its association and central role in regulating signaling pathways such a MAPK, wnt/β-catenin, PI3K/AkT, NF-κβ pathways in various cancers shows that it plays a vital role in metastasis. MTDH contribution to chemo and radiotherapy resistance provides a new direction for the development of anticancer therapeutics. Multiple mechanisms converge to promote expression of MTDH in cancers. Further studies are therefore warranted to determine whether the elevated MTDH expression has prognostic value for development...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Santosh K. Ghosh1*, Thomas S. McCormick1,2 and Aaron Weinberg1* 1Biological Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States 2Dermatology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States Human beta-defensins (hBDs, −1, 2, 3) are a family of epithelial cell derived antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that protect mucosal membranes from microbial challenges. In addition to their antimicrobial activities, they possess other functions; e.g., cell activation, proliferation, regulation of cytokine/chemokine production, migration, diffe...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
This study was supported by the Shanghai Sailing Program [grant number 17YF1425200, 2017]; Chinese National Natural Science Funding [grant number 81702249, 2017]; Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality [grant number 17511103403, 2017]; The funder has no role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. Conflict of Interest Statement The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest. Acknowledgments We acknowledge the ex...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
In conclusion, osmotic burst of inflated complement-damaged cells may occur, but these bursts are most likely a consequence of metabolic collapse of the cell rather than the cause of cell death. The Complement Cell Death Mediator: A Concerted Action of Toxic Moieties Membrane pores caused by complement were first visualized by electron microscopy on red blood cell membranes as large ring structures (22). Similar lesions were viewed on E. coli cell walls (23). Over the years, ample information on the fine ultrastructure of the MAC that can activate cell death has been gathered (24) and has been recently further examined (...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Pathology Research and Practice - Category: Pathology Source Type: research
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