Both old and new drugs may offer fresh ways to fight heart disease

Novel drugs — some old, some new — may offer fresh ways to reduce heart risks beyond the usual medicines to lower cholesterol and blood pressure.
Source: L.A. Times - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news

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This study suggests that for most, managing CAD with medications alone (the conservative approach) is as safe and effective as the more invasive strategy of cardiac catheterization and opening of the blocked artery. Findings of the ISCHEMIA trial ISCHEMIA followed over 5,000 patients with significant narrowing in one or more coronary arteries. Half of the patients were randomly selected to receive conservative treatment with optimal medical therapy (OMT) and lifestyle changes to treat risk factors such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol. The other half were given OMT and also sent for cardiac catheterization (thre...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 7 December 2019Source: Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition)Author(s): Carlos Escobar, Manuel Anguita, Vicente Arrarte, Vivencio Barrios, Ángel Cequier, Juan Cosín-Sales, Isabel Egocheaga, Esteban López de Sa, Luis Masana, Vicente Pallarés, Leopoldo Pérez de Isla, Xavier Pintó, José Ramón González Juanatey, José Luis ZamoranoAbstractThe current control of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol among patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is very low and this is associated with an inc...
Source: Revista Espanola de Cardiologia - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
A sizable body of evidence, both mechanistic and epidemiological, supports the idea that exercise slows age-related cognitive decline. The report here is an example of the type, noting the results of a study in which some of the participants were assigned to an exercise program. The exercising participants exhibited a slower decline in cognitive function, particularly memory, in comparison to the others. This is a representative result: in general, the consensus in the scientific literature is that regular exercise is beneficial to cognitive function over the long term. Researchers theorized that the healthy lifes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Conclusion. Nut consumption appears to exert a protective effect on cardiometabolic disease, possibly through improved concentrations of fasting glucose, total cholesterol, and LDL-C.
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
(The Lancet) The observational and modelling study which used individual-level data from almost 400,000 people, published in The Lancet, extends existing research because it suggests that increasing levels of non-HDL cholesterol may predict long-term cardiovascular risk by the age of 75 years. Past risk estimates of this kind are based on 10-year follow-up data.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 3 December 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Fabian J Brunner, Christoph Waldeyer, Francisco Ojeda, Veikko Salomaa, Frank Kee, Susana Sans, Barbara Thorand, Simona Giampaoli, Paolo Brambilla, Hugh Tunstall-Pedoe, Marie Moitry, Licia Iacoviello, Giovanni Veronesi, Guido Grassi, Ellisiv B Mathiesen, Stefan Söderberg, Allan Linneberg, Hermann Brenner, Philippe Amouyel, Jean FerrièresSummaryBackgroundThe relevance of blood lipid concentrations to long-term incidence of cardiovascular disease and the relevance of lipid-lowering therapy for cardiovascular disease outcomes is unclear....
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Researchers are using artificial intelligence to measure a common marker of heart disease via lung cancer screenings. The research was presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Low-dose chest CT is approved for lung cancer screening in high-risk people, such as long-time smokers. While these CT scans are intended to diagnose lung cancer, coronary artery calcium, a measure of plaque in the arteries, is also visible on CT. The coronary artery calcium score derived from CT is a well-established measure that helps doctors decide who should get cholesterol-lowering preventive medicatio...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Digital Health IVD Source Type: news
High cholesterol is known to be one of the primary risk factors for heart disease, since it can contribute to plaque buildup in the arteries. But even though the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends regular cholesterol testing starting around age 20, many Americans don’t give cholesterol—or heart disease, for that matter—much thought until later in life. A new modeling study published in the Lancet gives extra reason not to put off cholesterol screening and treatment. It confirms that high blood levels of “bad” (or non-HDL) cholesterol are associated with a greater risk o...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
Understanding risks early on could help protect from disease later in life and ‘offer chance to take statins or adjust diet’All adults as young as 25, as well as older people, need to know of their “bad cholesterol” levels so they can change their lifestyle or take drugs to protect themselves against heart attacks or strokes in later life, say scientists.A landmark study involving data from nearly 400,000 people in 19 countries has established for the first time that levels of non-HDL, or “bad cholesterol”, in the blood are closely linked to the risk of heart disease across the entire li...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: UK news Health Heart attack Stroke Young people Older people Nutrition Science Obesity World news Source Type: news
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