Identification of Host Adaptation Genes in Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli during Infection in Different Hosts Bacterial Infections

Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is an important human and animal pathogen. Despite the apparent similarities in their known virulence attributes, some ExPEC strains can cross the host species barrier and present a zoonotic potential, whereas other strains exhibit host specificity, suggesting the existence of unknown mechanisms that remain to be identified. We applied a transposon-directed insertion site sequencing (TraDIS) strategy to investigate the ExPEC XM strain, which is capable of crossing the host species barrier, and to screen for virulence-essential genes in both mammalian (mouse) and avian (duck) models of E. coli-related septicemia. We identified 151 genes essential for systemic infection in both mammalian and avian models, 97 required only in the mammalian model, and 280 required only in the avian model. Ten genes/gene clusters were selected for further validation, and their contributions to ExPEC virulence in both mammalian and avian models or mammalian- or avian-only models were confirmed by animal tests. This represents the first comprehensive genome-wide analysis of virulence-essential genes required for systemic infections in two different host species and provides a further comprehensive understanding of ExPEC-related virulence, host specificity, and adaptation.
Source: Infection and Immunity - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Bacterial Infections Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 31 October 2019Source: Veterinary MicrobiologyAuthor(s): Xiangkai Zhuge, Min Jiang, Fang Tang, Yu Sun, Yiming Ji, Feng Xue, Jianluan Ren, Weiyun Zhu, Jianjun DaiAbstractColisepticemia caused by bloodstream infection of the extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) has become a serious public health problem. The recent emergence of the colistin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, especially mcr-1-positive E. coli (MCRPEC) exerts great concern around the world. The molecular epidemiology and zoonosis risk of avian-origin MCRPEC are reported to be substantially lower. Here, we presented ...
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
The objective of the current study was to compare the ability of the well-characterized UPEC strain, UTI89, and the APEC strain, F149H1S2, to infect human and avian cells in culture and to cause salpingitis in an infection model in adult laying hens. In vitro characterization showed that the strains grew equally well in human urine, and both were able to infect human intestinal (Int407) and bladder (J82) epithelial cell lines, and they survived in avian macrophages (HD11) to the same extent. Groups of adult birds were inoculated with 108 bacteria directly into the oviduct using a surgical procedure. After an infection peri...
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
To better understand public health implications of waterfowl as reservoirs for zoonotic sources of Campylobacter in recreational waters, we developed a Gallus gallus (chick) model of infection to assess the pathogenicity of environmental isolates of Campylobacter. This method involved exposure of 1-day-old chicks through ingestion of water, the natural route of infection. Viable Campylobacter from laboratory-infected animals were monitored by using a modified non-invasive sampling of fresh chick excreta followed by a passive polycarbonate-filter migration culture assay. The method was used to evaluate the infectivities of ...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
The objective of the current study was to compare the ability of the well-characterized UPEC strain, UTI89, and the APEC strain, F149H1S2, to infect human and avian cells in culture and to cause salpingitis in an infection model in adult laying hens. In vitro characterization showed that the strains grew equally well in human urine, and both were able to infect human intestinal (Int407) and bladder (J82) epithelial cell lines, and they survived in avian macrophages (HD11) to the same extent. Groups of adult birds were inoculated with 108 bacteria directly into the oviduct using a surgical procedure. After an infection peri...
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
This study provides new insight into the characterization of foodborne C. perfringens and highlights the potential of WGS for the investigation of FBOs. Introduction Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium, known as an important causative agent of foodborne and non-foodborne gastroenteritis (Grass et al., 2013). The ability of this bacterium to form resistant spores contributes to its survival in many environmental niches, including soil, sewage, foods, and the intestinal microbiota of humans and animals (Xiao, 2014; Li et al., 2016). C. perfringens can cause necro...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
This report describes the dynamics of FQ-associated mutations in the highly resistant in FQ mutants in S. Enteritidis. In addition, we characterized a deletion in the ramRA integenic region, demonstrating that this frequent mutation in the highly resistant FQ mutants provide resistance or reduce susceptibility to multiple families of antibiotics. Introduction Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) is a major zoonotic pathogen worldwide (Bangtrakulnonth et al., 2004; Scallan et al., 2011). Infections caused by this pathogen have been mainly associated with gastroenteritis, an acute self-limiting intestinal infection. Howeve...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Med Microbiol Source Type: research
Abstract Colistin has been re-assessed as a critically important antimicrobial in humans due to its efficacy against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria, in particular P. aeruginosa, A. baumannii, and K. pneumoniae. The recent discovery of mobile colistin resistance determinants in humans and animals has brought concerns regarding the future of this antimicrobial. In this paper, we aim to highlight the current challenges with colistin resistant bacteria and to summarise reliable global data on colistin resistance in poultry production. In addition, we present and compare data from a screening for colistin ...
Source: Avian Pathology - Category: Pathology Authors: Tags: Avian Pathol Source Type: research
In conclusion, this outbreak investigation highlighted the importance of close collaboration between regional Public Health Services, the NVWA, the RIVM and diagnostic laboratories. Through a combined microbiological, epidemiological and source tracing approach, raw and undercooked beef products could be identified as the source of the S. Typhimurium outbreak. This outbreak yet again emphasizes the importance of awareness among consumers of the risk of infection when consuming or handling raw meat products. To increase transparency for consumers, we recommend adding warning labels to risk food products. Competing Intere...
Source: PLOS Currents Outbreaks - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Canadian Journal of Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Source Type: research
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