Presentation and Management of Food Allergy in Breastfed Infants and Risks of Maternal Elimination Diets

Publication date: Available online 18 November 2019Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Puja Sood Rajani, Hayley Martin, Marion Groetch, Kirsi M. JärvinenAbstractBreastfeeding is currently recommended as the optimal source of nutrition to infants. However, there are several studies that have shown clinical IgE and non-IgE-mediated reactions to foods in exclusively breastfeeding infants, specifically to cow’s milk, egg, peanut, and fish. Literature suggests that antigenic food proteins present in human milk can be found in substantial enough amounts to elicit clinical reactions in some, already-sensitized infants, including anaphylaxis, eczema exacerbation, and non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergic syndromes. Diagnosis of food allergy in a breastfed infant and identification of the trigger foods in the mother’s diet can be especially challenging in infants with delayed symptoms, such as eczema and gastrointestinal symptoms. Management is further complicated in infants with atopic dermatitis, who have increased caloric needs and therefore in whom nutrition is an extremely important factor for growth and development. One needs to balance possible benefits with risks of further food sensitization through the skin when foods are eliminated from their diets. We review here the literature on clinical presentation and evidence for food allergy in exclusively breastfed infants, including presence of food antigens in h...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

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Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
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