Big Study Finds Many Heart Procedures Won ’t Cut Risk of Having Heart Attack

This study clearly goes against what has been the common wisdom for the last 30, 40 years” and may lead to less testing and invasive treatment for such patients in the future, said Dr. Glenn Levine, a Baylor College of Medicine cardiologist with no role in the research. Some doctors still may quibble with the study, but it was very well done “and I think the results are extremely believable,” he said. About 17 million Americans have clogged arteries that crimp the heart’s blood supply, which can cause periodic chest pain. Cheap and generic aspirin, cholesterol-lowering drugs and blood pressure medicines are known to cut the risk of a heart attack for these folks, but many doctors also recommend a procedure to improve blood flow. That’s either a bypass — open-heart surgery to detour around blockages — or angioplasty, in which doctors push a tube through an artery to the clog, inflate a tiny balloon and place a stent, or mesh scaffold, to prop the artery open. Twelve years ago, a big study found that angioplasty was no better than medicines for preventing heart attacks and deaths in non-emergency heart patients, but many doctors balked at the results and quarreled with the methods. So the federal government spent $100 million for the new study, which is twice as large, spanned 37 countries and included people with more severe disease — a group most likely to benefit from stents or a bypass. All 5,179 participants had stress tests,...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news

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In this study, we reported a new case of primary DSRCT of the tibia in a 33-year-old man who had intermittent pain in the left tibia. Radiographs showed transparent lesions in the left upper tibial. MRI revealed a lobular, lytic and ill-identified lesion with adjacent soft tissues swelling of the upper left tibia. CT confirmed notable destruction and wormlike osteolysis of the bone cortex. PET/CT showed a mass of high uptakes, indicating the malignance. He accepted surgical resection with followed multi-agent chemotherapy, containing vincristine, doxorubicin, ifosfamide and etoposide. Clinically and radiologically, the pat...
Source: Journal of Bone Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Source: Journal of Pain Research - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Journal of Pain Research Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Hyperthermic Mitomycin using the HIVEC® device is a rather safe and well tolerated treatment. Efficiency remains partial as 27.3% of patients experienced recurrence during the first year. These data should be confirmed by prospective multicentric studies. PMID: 31787540 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Progres en Urologie - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Prog Urol Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2020Source: Materials Today Communications, Volume 22Author(s): Franc Zupanič, Christian Gspan, Jaka Burja, Tonica BončinaAbstractAn Al-Mn-Cu alloy was microalloyed with beryllium, scandium and zirconium, cast into a copper mould, and aged at different temperatures. It was characterised using X-Ray Diffraction, Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The compression tests of samples aged at 400 °C for 1 h were performed at room temperature, 300 °C and 350 °C, while the accelerated creep tests were performed at 300 °...
Source: Materials Today Communications - Category: Materials Science Source Type: research
Medication side-effects can seem unbearable at times: dry mouth, nausea, dizziness, constipation. Certain prescriptions can also increase our risks for developing chronic conditions like thyroid disease and diabetes. Three years ago, I decided that the pills’ side-effects weren’t worth the relief they brought, so I slowly weaned off all my medication. I then plummeted into a severe depression that ended up taking a far greater toll on my health than the nuisance of my drugs. You may be justifiably concerned about how your mood stabilizer and antidepressant are altering your biochemistry, but also consider the g...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression General Medications Antidepressant Cognitive Decline Diabetes Mood Stabilizer Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, we found a gradient of increasing blood pressure with higher levels of BMI. The fact that this gradient is present even in the fully adjusted analyses suggests that BMI may cause a direct effect on blood pressure, independent of other clinical risk factors. PRRX1 as a Possible Point of Control for Remyelination https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/12/prrx1-as-a-possible-point-of-control-for-remyelination/ Researchers here outline what is possibly a new point of intervention in the processes that maintain the myelin sheath that wraps nerves. This sheath is vital to the correct operatio...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Taking a low-dose aspirin every day has long been known to cut the chances of another heart attack, stroke or other heart problem in people who already have had one, but the risks don’t outweigh the benefits for most other folks, major new research finds. Although it’s been used for more than a century, aspirin’s value in many situations is still unclear. The latest studies are some of the largest and longest to test this pennies-a-day blood thinner in people who don’t yet have heart disease or a blood vessel-related problem. One found that aspirin did not help prevent first strokes or heart attacks...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch aspirin Source Type: news
This report captures the state of the research community in a nutshell: progress in the sense that ever more scientists are willing to make the treatment of aging the explicit goal of their research, but, unfortunately, there is still a long way to go in improving the nature of that research. It is still near entirely made up of projects that cannot possibly produce a robust and large impact on human life span. The only course of action likely to extend life by decades in the near future is implementation of the SENS vision for rejuvenation therapies - to repair the molecular damage that causes aging. Everything else on th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The post below first appeared on HuffPost Healthy Living on April 20. Jen Hyde, a 30-year-old poet and artist living in Brooklyn, has a congenital heart defect. By the age of 25, Hyde had two open-heart surgeries, including a heart valve replacement. “I know that heart disease is the number one killer of women in America,” Hyde said. “I’m currently in great shape, but part of staying this way means building a strong relationship with my cardiologist so that the care I receive is preventative, not reactive.” Hyde is not alone in suffering from heart health issues — in the U.S., cardiova...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Chronic Conditions Source Type: blogs
Imagine someone in the throes of a heart attack. If you pictured a man clutching his chest in agony, that’s understandable. At younger ages, men face a greater risk of heart disease than women. On average, a first heart attack — the most common manifestation of this prevalent disease — strikes men at age 65. For women, the average age of a first heart attack is 72. However, heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both genders. In fact, since 1984, more women have died of heart disease than men each year, although that is partly because women generally live longer than men. So ...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Heart Health Women's Health Source Type: news
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