Stents and bypass surgery are no more effective than drugs for stable heart disease, highly anticipated trial results show

Long-awaited study results may finally settle the question of when to use stents and bypass surgery in patients with stable heart disease, showing that drugs work equally as well in preventing heart attacks, strokes and heart-related death.
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news

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Time-restricted eating, a form of intermittent fasting, appears to benefit people with metabolic syndrome, who are at a higher risk of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - Category: Science Authors: Source Type: news
TYPE 2 diabetes is a condition which affects a person ’s blood sugar control, and left untreated, complications such as heart disease and stroke can occur. To prevent or keep the condition in check, some experts recommend drinking a certain type of water.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(The Lancet) The observational and modelling study which used individual-level data from almost 400,000 people, published in The Lancet, extends existing research because it suggests that increasing levels of non-HDL cholesterol may predict long-term cardiovascular risk by the age of 75 years. Past risk estimates of this kind are based on 10-year follow-up data.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 3 December 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Fabian J Brunner, Christoph Waldeyer, Francisco Ojeda, Veikko Salomaa, Frank Kee, Susana Sans, Barbara Thorand, Simona Giampaoli, Paolo Brambilla, Hugh Tunstall-Pedoe, Marie Moitry, Licia Iacoviello, Giovanni Veronesi, Guido Grassi, Ellisiv B Mathiesen, Stefan Söderberg, Allan Linneberg, Hermann Brenner, Philippe Amouyel, Jean FerrièresSummaryBackgroundThe relevance of blood lipid concentrations to long-term incidence of cardiovascular disease and the relevance of lipid-lowering therapy for cardiovascular disease outcomes is unclear....
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
For nearly two decades, the American Heart Association (AHA) has recommended that people with coronary heart disease (CHD) consume omega-3-fatty acids (the kinds of fatty acids found in fish and fish oil) to prevent another heart attack. This recommendation was based on early randomized, controlled trials, which found that fish oil supplementation was associated with lower rates of stroke, heart attack, and death in people who already had heart disease. On the other hand, the impact of fish oil supplements on preventing a first heart attack or stroke (primary prevention) was never clearly demonstrated. Recently there have ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Heart Health Nutrition Source Type: blogs
High cholesterol is known to be one of the primary risk factors for heart disease, since it can contribute to plaque buildup in the arteries. But even though the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends regular cholesterol testing starting around age 20, many Americans don’t give cholesterol—or heart disease, for that matter—much thought until later in life. A new modeling study published in the Lancet gives extra reason not to put off cholesterol screening and treatment. It confirms that high blood levels of “bad” (or non-HDL) cholesterol are associated with a greater risk o...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
Understanding risks early on could help protect from disease later in life and ‘offer chance to take statins or adjust diet’All adults as young as 25, as well as older people, need to know of their “bad cholesterol” levels so they can change their lifestyle or take drugs to protect themselves against heart attacks or strokes in later life, say scientists.A landmark study involving data from nearly 400,000 people in 19 countries has established for the first time that levels of non-HDL, or “bad cholesterol”, in the blood are closely linked to the risk of heart disease across the entire li...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: UK news Health Heart attack Stroke Young people Older people Nutrition Science Obesity World news Source Type: news
Abstract BACKGROUND: Because premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) are one of the most common arrhythmias, but with unclear causative mechanisms, we studied the hemodynamic features that can cause symptomatic PVCs.Methods and Results:We studied 109 patients (48 males, age 60±19 years) with frequent monomorphic PVCs and no structural heart disease. The left ventricular inflow diastolic filling velocity was recorded by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) at the time of PVCs in all patients. We assessed the PVC E wave flow (E wave velocity×duration at PVC). A total of 38 patients (35%) had PVC-r...
Source: Circulation Journal - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Circ J Source Type: research
Drinking alcohol causes damage to your health in both the short term and long term, even for moderate drinkers. For individuals who suffer from addiction to alcohol and frequently drink in excess, these risks become higher. Knowing the risks of drinking alcohol is important to help avoid drinking to excess and reduce the likelihood of these risks. Short-Term Risks of Drinking Alcohol There are many short-term risks that occur when drinking alcohol. These risks can happen to anyone, including individuals suffering from alcohol use disorder, or individuals who are drinking for the very first time. Injuries When you drink al...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol dependency alcohol detox alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcohol treatment facility alcohol use risks Source Type: blogs
TUESDAY, Dec. 3, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Following a vegan diet for five weeks may decrease risk factors for heart disease, new research shows. The study included 50 African Americans who were asked to eat only prepared meals...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
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