IJERPH, Vol. 16, Pages 4535: Predictors and Trend in Attendance for Breast Cancer Screening in Lithuania, 2006 –2014

This study aimed to determine the trend in the attendance for mammography screening during 2006–2014 and to identify the factors that are predictive for participation in it. The study sample consisted of 1941 women aged 50–64 years, who participated in five cross-sectional biennial postal surveys of Lithuanian Health Behavior Monitoring, carried out in independent national random samples. The attendance for screening was identified if women reported having had a mammogram within the last two years. The proportion of women attending the screening was continuously increasing from 20.0% in 2006 up to 65.8% in 2014. The attendance for BC screening was associated with the participation in cervical cancer screening. A higher level of education, living in a city, frequent contact with a doctor, and healthy behaviors (fresh-vegetable consumption, physical activity, and absence of alcohol abuse) were associated with higher participation rates in BC screening. To increase BC screening uptake and to reduce inequalities in attendance, new strategies of organized BC screening program using systematic personal invitations are required in Lithuania.
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research

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Source: European Journal of Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Longevity public health Source Type: news
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Abstract Limited health system capacities and competing health priorities in low and middle income countries (LMICs) necessitate a pragmatic approach to population-based cancer screening. Thus, the challenges faced by LMICs to implement a 'western' model of screening for common cancers and the possible means to overcome these challenges are presented. Breast cancer is the number one cancer with a rising trend in the majority of LMICs. Implementation of mass-scale mammography-based screening is not feasible and sustainable in most of them. While some LMICs have introduced breast cancer screening base...
Source: Bundesgesundheitsblatt, Gesundheitsforschung, Gesundheitsschutz - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz Source Type: research
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Innovation Health Source Type: news
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Source: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Asian Pac J Cancer Prev Source Type: research
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Source: EyeForPharma - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Preventive Medicine - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research
Racial and ethnic disparities exist in cancer screening and management among Hispanics. Although cancer poses a burden among Hispanic women compared to non-Hispanic white women (nHw), screening rates for breast, colorectal and cervical cancer in Hispanic women lag behind nHw. The Hispanic population is heterogeneous and comprises individuals with diverse heritages. Furthermore, considerable variations in health outcomes and practices have been observed across Hispanic subgroups, supporting the relevance of studying each subgroup separately. Since early detection can reduce the burden of cancer, it is important to identify ...
Source: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Race, Admixture, and Ethnicity: Poster Presentations - Proffered Abstracts Source Type: research
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