Learning How to Set Boundaries with Strangers

  “Boundaries aren’t about punishing. Boundaries are about creating safety for yourself.” – Sheri Keffer The person sitting beside you at the bar keeps talking to you despite your obvious disinterest. The flirty Uber driver mentions—three times—how beautiful you are. Your cousin’s new boyfriend gives you a too-long hug with wandering hands. In awkward situations with strangers, we tend to hope that non-verbal cues will be sufficient to set a boundary. We use silence, crossed arms, uncomfortable laughter, and glares to communicate discomfort. But some folks cannot—or will not—take the hint. Here, we find ourselves at a crossroads: We can either set clear verbal boundaries or tolerate the uncomfortable behavior indefinitely. For the longest time, I struggled to set boundaries in awkward situations with strangers. Throughout childhood, I was taught how to be kind, nice, and open-minded—but never how to have difficult conversations and advocate for myself. I worried that setting firm boundaries was mean, so I tolerated uncomfortable behavior in silence, which allowed the awkward situations to escalate even further. Eventually, I realized that setting firm boundaries is a form of verbal self-defense. It is our responsibility to advocate for, and protect, our time and space. My goal for this article is to demystify the process of boundary-setting and offer concrete suggestions of language you can use to be clear and ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Publishers Spirituality & Health Boundaries strangers Source Type: blogs

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This article includes references to self-injury, intravenous drug use and disordered eating.* One in five US high school students have reported being bullied. Approximately 160,000 teenagers have skipped school as a preventative measure. I encountered bullies for the first time in second grade, in the midst of such an innocent time of my youth. I dreaded entering my elementary school classroom, as I was well aware of what my presence would entail. I endured both verbal and physical harassment from my fellow peers for nearly a decade. I was passive, inevitably leading to the acceptance of my “fate,” in addition ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Anorexia Bullying Depression Eating Disorders Personal Stories Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Anorexia Nervosa Drug Use heroin Self Harm Self Injury Source Type: news
One of the new trends on social media is “dopamine fasting,” the idea that depriving yourself is somehow good for you.  Is it? Does this trend have any benefit? Could it even be harmful? What’s the science behind it? On today’s episode, Gabe welcomes back Psych Central founder and editor-in-chief, Dr. John Grohol.  Join us as Dr. John gives us the 411 on dopamine fasting. SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW Guest information for ‘Dr. John Grohol Dopamine’ Podcast Episode John M. Grohol, Psy.D. is a pioneer in online mental health and psychology. Recognizing the educational and social pot...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior General Interview Podcast Psychiatry The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
By SAURABH JHA, MD Slumdog TB No one knows who gave Rahul Roy tuberculosis. Roy’s charmed life as a successful trader involved traveling in his Mercedes C class between his apartment on the plush Nepean Sea Road in South Mumbai and offices in Bombay Stock Exchange. He cared little for Mumbai’s weather. He seldom rolled down his car windows – his ambient atmosphere, optimized for his comfort, rarely changed. Historically TB, or “consumption” as it was known, was a Bohemian malady; the chronic suffering produced a rhapsody which produced fine art. TB was fashionable in Victorian Britain...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence Health Tech Saurabh Jha TB tuberculosis Source Type: blogs
The sun is streaming through the curtains of a room that you have never seen before. You squint and rub your bloodshot eyes, as your hand reaches out to feel the prone body of the snoring person who a few hours earlier was a stranger. You notice your own naked body and wonder how the two of you spent the interceding time. You look at the floor next to the bed and see your clothes, strewn across the carpet, wine bottles and glasses, a few joints, and a line of cocaine on the dresser across the room. You slide out of bed, gather your belongings, hightail it to the bathroom and quickly get yourself street ready. Wondering ho...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Sexuality Substance Abuse Drug Abuse Rape Sexual Assault Sober Support Sobriety Trauma Source Type: news
What exactly is psychosis? What happens in the brain of a person with schizophrenia who is hallucinating? Schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers shares her personal hallucinations and delusions and Dr. Joseph Goldberg, who specializes in researching what goes on in the brain when someone is experiencing psychosis, joins to break down how the brain functions during psychotic episodes. Host Rachel Star Withers, a diagnosed schizophrenic, and co-host Gabe Howard delve into these intense subjects in this episode of Inside Schizophrenia.  Highlights from “Psychosis in Schizophrenia” Episode [02:13]  Rachel, do...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior Disorders General Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Active psychosis Delusions Delusions Hallucinations Living with Schizoprenia Mental Disorder Mental Illness Psychology psychotic Psychotic Break Source Type: blogs
A behavioral brain fad called “dopamine fasting” (#dopaminefasting) has been floating around the internet for the past year. The idea is that by restricting most of your pleasurable daily activities — from social media, to watching videos, gaming, talking, or even eating — you can “reset” your brain. The idea also plays into people’s simplistic beliefs about how the brain works. Can you have conscious control over discrete dopamine levels in your brain? Let’s delve into the science behind one of your brain’s most important neurotransmitters, dopamine. During a “d...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior General Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Psychology Research dopamine fasting Neuroscience Neurotransmitter social media Technology unplug Source Type: blogs
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Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Painkiller Substance Abuse opiate opiate addiction opioid opioids oxycodone oxycodone abuse prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug use prescription drugs pre Source Type: blogs
Before the CDC initiated its investigation of vaping-associated respiratory illness (VARI) on August 1, here is what we knew about the outbreak:This outbreak is associated with vaping. If you want to avoid getting sick, you should avoid vaping.After nearly eight weeks of CDC investigation, here is what the CDC's current conclusion is about the outbreak:This outbreak is associated with vaping. If you want to avoid getting sick, you should avoid vaping.In other words, the investigation has added nothing in terms of public knowledge. Most importantly, it has added nothing in terms of specific steps that the public can take to...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs
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Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
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Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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