Long-Term Occupational Sleep Loss and Post-Retirement Cognitive Decline or Dementia.

CONCLUSION: We found no evidence that long-term exposure to work-related sleep loss had resulted in cognitive decline or early dementia symptoms in this sample of retired maritime pilots. PMID: 31726459 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord Source Type: research

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What exactly is psychosis? What happens in the brain of a person with schizophrenia who is hallucinating? Schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers shares her personal hallucinations and delusions and Dr. Joseph Goldberg, who specializes in researching what goes on in the brain when someone is experiencing psychosis, joins to break down how the brain functions during psychotic episodes. Host Rachel Star Withers, a diagnosed schizophrenic, and co-host Gabe Howard delve into these intense subjects in this episode of Inside Schizophrenia.  Highlights from “Psychosis in Schizophrenia” Episode [02:13]  Rachel, do...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior Disorders General Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Active psychosis Delusions Delusions Hallucinations Living with Schizoprenia Mental Disorder Mental Illness Psychology psychotic Psychotic Break Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: The use of antidepressants, especially SNRIs, was associated with a shorter survival time of sCJD patients. The possible changes in neurotransmitters should be emphasized. Scientifically, this study may provide insights into the mechanism of CJD. Clinically, it may contribute to the early diagnosis of CJD.IntroductionDepression is common in the elderly. Its prevalence rate is as high as 11.19%, and this increases progressively with worsening cognitive impairment (1). The presence of depression is an acknowledged risk factor for dementia (2); it can even double the risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (3, 4)...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions: This study improves the knowledge on clinical significance of RBD symptoms in ET patients. Our preliminary findings demonstrate that presence of RBD in ET is associated with neurocognitive impairment, but not with cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Further longitudinal studies are needed to investigate whether ET patients with RBD will develop a frank dementia over the time. Introduction Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most common neurological disease among adults. Traditionally, it is defined by a core of clinical motor symptoms characterized by kinetic/postural tremor affecting hand, head, or other par...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Wei Li1†, Wei-Min Xiao1†, Yang-Kun Chen1*, Jian-Feng Qu1, Yong-Lin Liu1, Xue-Wen Fang2, Han-Yu Weng1 and Gen-Pei Luo11Department of Neurology, Dongguan People’s Hospital, Dongguan, China2Department of Radiology, Dongguan People’s Hospital, Dongguan, ChinaBackground: Anxiety is prevalent after a stroke. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of poststroke anxiety (PSA) remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and neuroimaging risk factors for development of PSA and examine the effects of PSA on activities of daily living (ADL) and quality of life (...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
C-Reactive Protein and Risk of Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Xiaohui Qiu†, Yousheng Xiao†, Jingjing Wu, Lu Gan, Yanning Huang and Jin Wang* Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, China Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) has been identified as a common inflammation-related cytokine. Although publications indicate that CRP is associated with the pathogenesis of neurological disorders and deemed to be a “risk factor” for Parkinson's disease (PD), the evidence exists still indefinitely. Here...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions Dysautonomic symptoms frequently occuring in α-synucleinopathies comprise cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, urogenital and thermoregulatory disturbances. These symptoms reduce quality of life and worsen prognosis. The understanding of their pathophysiology, as well as the detection of α-synuclein deposition and autonomic dysfunction in the premotor stages of α-synucleinopathies may be key for identifying novel treatment targets and improving clinical outcomes. While causative treatment is not yet available, improvement of quality of life can be achieved by personalized symptomatic treatment r...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
This study had a large sample size and obtained positive findings in both patients’ subjective ratings and in inflammatory marker levels. It demonstrates the benefits of adding Tai Chi to an antidepressant regimen but does not examine the specific effect of Tai Chi on depression.Field et al. (16) investigated the effects of combined Tai Chi/yoga in 92 prenatally depressed pregnant women. They found that women practicing Tai Chi/yoga (20 min per week for 12 weeks) had lower depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance scores compared to a waitlist control group (Table 1). This study had a large sample size and provided ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Marcia H. Ratner, Vidhya Kumaresan and David H. Farb* Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, United States Memory dysfunction is a symptomatic feature of many neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders; however, the basic underlying mechanisms of memory and altered states of circuitry function associated with disorders of memory remain a vast unexplored territory. The initial discovery of endogenous neurosteroids triggered a quest to elucidate their role as neuromodulators in normal and diseased brain functio...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
AbstractAlzheimer ’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia characterized by the prevalent memory impairment. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may represent the early stage of AD, in particular when MCI patients show biomarkers consistent with AD pathology (MCI due to AD). Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) f requently affect both MCI and AD patients. Cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) tau and β-amyloid42 (A β42) levels are actually considered the most sensitive and specific biomarkers for AD neurodegeneration. In the present retrospective observational study, we evaluated CSF biomarkers and neuropsychological...
Source: Neurological Sciences - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Every caregiver of a person living with Alzheimer's, Lewy Body dementia, Parkinson's or any other related dementia faces this gut wrenching question -Should I put my loved with dementia in a nursing home or memory care facility?By Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomWe all face this gut wrenching decision. Most of us don't want to do it. But sometimes, it is the only decision, and only right decision.There are a long list of reasons why you might have to place your loved one in a nursing home or long term care memory facility.Topic -Dementia CareLet me start by making this clear -it is not your fault.It is not your fault th...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care facilities care of dementia patients caregiver dementia care elderly dementia care help alzheimer's help with dementia care how to care memory care facilities nursing home Source Type: blogs
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