Alopecia in Belgian Blue crossbred calves: a case series

Alopecia is defined as the partial or complete absence of hair from areas of the body where it normally grows. Alopecia secondary to an infectious disease or parasitic infestation is commonly seen in cattle. I...
Source: BMC Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

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We report a patient with delusional parasitosis who consumed veterinary albendazole purchased on the Internet, leading to pancytopenia, transaminase elevation, and alopecia. A 53-year-old man was sent to the emergency department (ED) by his gastroenterologist because of abnormal laboratory results. The patient had chronic abdominal pain and believed he was infected with parasites. He purchased two bottles of veterinary-grade albendazole on the Internet, and over the 3 weeks before his ED visit, he consumed 113.6 g of albendazole (a normal maximal daily dose is 800 mg). Five days before admission, he noticed hair loss and a...
Source: The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Trop Med Hyg Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 August 2019Source: Veterinary ParasitologyAuthor(s): Ana Vitória Verde Oliveira Rocha, Brenda Fernanda Sodré Moreno, Aline Diniz Cabral, Nayara Mendes Louzeiro, Leandro Macedo Miranda, Vivian Magalhães Brandão dos Santos, Francisco Borges Costa, Rita de Maria Seabra Nogueira, Arlei Marcili, Márcia Aparecida Sperança, Andréa Pereira da CostaAbstractVisceral leishmaniasis is a zoonotic disease caused by Leishmania infantum for which dogs are the main reservoir. In South America, presence of this disease is expanding along with increasing d...
Source: Veterinary Parasitology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
ConclusionIn this review, the historical discovery and development of CEP are retraced, and the key mediators involved in its mode of action are presented. The past, present, and future of CEP are recapitulated. This review also suggests new opportunities to extend the clinical applications of this well-tolerated old Japanese drug.Graphical Abstract
Source: Phytomedicine - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
AbstractA male Persian cat was presented with a history of alopecia at the dorsal tail region, with mild  pruritus, flaking of skin and the owner’s complaint of pruritus on herself and her family members. All the vital signs of the cat were found within the normal reference range. Skin scraping and hair samples were found to be negative forDemodex spp. andSarcoptes spp. of mites, pediculosis and fungal infestation. Physical examination of the whole body revealed absence of fleas or flea eggs. Further,  food hypersensitivity was ruled out by gradually changing the previous wheat based diet to a com...
Source: Journal of Parasitic Diseases - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Blepharitis occurring in the absence of other skin lesions is rare. The most common underlying cause of blepharitis is allergic dermatitis. Measurement of tear production should be recommended in all cases of blepharitis. PMID: 30828906 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Veterinary Dermatology - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Tags: Vet Dermatol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 January 2019Source: Veterinary ParasitologyAuthor(s): David W. Ramilo, Carla Monteiro, Marrion Carreira, Isabel Pereira da Fonseca, Luís CardosoAbstractTrombiculids parasitize a wide variety of terrestrial vertebrates, including domestic animals, throughout the world. They are parasites only during their larval stages, causing several dermatological lesions on their hosts, such as acute dermatitis, erythema, excoriation, erosion, papules, crusts and alopecia on the ear margins, face, interdigital spaces and abdomen. Neotrombicula is one of the several genera in Trombiculidae fam...
Source: Veterinary Parasitology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
AbstractExperimental transmission patterns involved with the establishment of mange in dogs were studied to ascertain the effective means of infestation model for mange experiments in dogs. A total of eighteen (18) dogs were used out of which three (3) were naturally infested withSarcoptes scabie varcanis. Five (5) healthy dogs were co-mingled with the three (3) donor dogs for direct contact transmission. Another five (5) mange free dogs were aggregated in a kennel recently vacated by mange infested dogs for environmental and formite transmission while the last five (5) healthy dogs had scrapings from a proximate area of m...
Source: Journal of Parasitic Diseases - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 17 July 2018Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and WildlifeAuthor(s): Amy S. Northover, Aileen D. Elliot, Sarah Keatley, Ziyuan Lim, Adriana Botero, Amanda Ash, Alan J. Lymbery, Adrian F. Wayne, Stephanie S. Godfrey, R.C. Andrew ThompsonAbstractDuring monitoring of critically endangered woylie (Bettongia penicillata) populations within the south-west of Western Australia, an adult female woylie was euthanased after being found in extremely poor body condition with diffuse alopecia, debilitating skin lesions and severe ectoparasite infestation. Trypanosoma copemani G...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
Publication date: April 2018Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife, Volume 7, Issue 1Author(s): Viviana Gonzalez-Astudillo, Omar D. Leon-Alvarado, Paula Andrea Ossa-Lopez, Fredy Arvey Rivera-Paez, Héctor E. Ramírez-ChavesAbstractThe Quichua porcupine (Coendou quichua) is a neotropical rodent with uncertain taxonomic and conservation status. Two Quichua porcupines with severe hyperkeratosis and alopecia were found in the Magdalena River Basin of Colombia. Sarcoptes scabiei, the mite causing mange, a disease carried mainly by domestic animals, was confirmed via parasitological an...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
Abstract Climate change contributes to the increase in severity and frequency of flooding, which is the most frequent and deadly disaster worldwide. Flood‐related damage can be very severe and include health effects. Among those health impacts, dermatological diseases are one of the most frequently encountered. Both infectious and noninfectious dermatological conditions are increasing after flooding. We searched PubMed using the search term climate change OR global warming OR rainfall OR flooding OR skin. Articles published in the English‐language literature were included. We also searched the International Society of ...
Source: International Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
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