Greater risks of complications, infections, and revisions in the obese versus non-obese total hip arthroplasty population of 2,190,824 patients: a meta-analysis and systematic review

Obesity is an epidemic, especially in developed countries. This affects the general health of these patients, especially when they are having a major surgical procedure such as total hip arthroplasty (THA). Several articles have described the effects of obesity on THA with varying conclusions. This meta-analysis aims to compare the outcomes, complications, and peri-operative parameters of THA in the obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) vs non-obese (BMI
Source: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Source Type: research

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This report 1) describes the diabetes epidemic and the health impact of diabetes and diabetes-related complications, 2) highlights the physical therapist's role as front-line provider, and 3) provides recommendations for physical therapists in screening for diabetes risk factors and diabetes-related complications and considerations for patient management. We focus on type 2 diabetes. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 28 Nov 2019. doi:10.2519/jospt.2020.9154. PMID: 31775555 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Physical Therapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: J Orthop Sports Phys Ther Source Type: research
Background.Obesity is an epidemic, especially in developed countries. This affects the general health of these patients, especially when they are having a major surgical procedure such as total hip arthroplasty (THA). Several articles have described the effects of obesity on THA with varying conclusions. This meta-analysis aims to compare the outcomes, complications, and peri-operative parameters of THA in the obese (BMI ≥30kg/m2) versus non-obese (BMI
Source: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewObesity in the older adult is a burgeoning health epidemic that leads to increased morbidity, disability, and institutionalization. This review presents a brief overview of geriatric-specific consequences of obesity by highlighting the risks and benefits of intentional weight loss.Recent FindingsIntentional weight loss reduces the extent of adiposity-related illnesses, yet the approach in older adults is fraught with challenges. Interventions combining caloric restriction and physical exercise (aerobic and resistance) maximize fat loss and minimize loss of muscle and bone. Interventions are also ef...
Source: Current Diabetes Reports - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
The United States is in an obesity epidemic. Obesity has multiple common comorbid conditions, including lower extremity arthritis. We sought to examine the course of treatment for a population with body mass index (BMI) ≥ 40 kg/m2 and osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. We investigated decision criteria that influenced arthroplasty surgeons to recommend non-operative management versus total joint arthroplasty (TJA). For those patients who ultimately received TJA, we compared outcomes in this population to tho se with BMI
Source: The Journal of Arthroplasty - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Source Type: research
The United States is in an obesity epidemic. Obesity has multiple common comorbid conditions, including lower extremity arthritis. We sought to examine the course of treatment for a population with body mass index (BMI) ≥40 kg/m2 and osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. We investigated decision criteria that influenced arthroplasty surgeons to recommend nonoperative management vs total joint arthroplasty (TJA). For those patients who ultimately received TJA, we compared outcomes in this population to those wit h BMI
Source: The Journal of Arthroplasty - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Obesity is a modern-day epidemic with increasing prevalence that is directly impacting the global burden of primary total hip arthroplasty. The risk of requiring total hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis increases incrementally with increasing obesity class. Surgical intervention in obese patients presents a set of unique challenges that should be recognized by the treating medical team. Although predominantly satisfactory outcomes have been reported, perioperative anaesthetic and surgical concerns require thorough patient assessment. There is an increased potential risk of thrombogenic and septic complic...
Source: British Journal of Hospital Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Br J Hosp Med (Lond) Source Type: research
n O Abstract Background and purpose - The prevalence of obesity is on the rise, becoming a worldwide epidemic. The main purpose of this register-based observational study was to investigate whether different BMI classes are associated with increased risk of reoperation within 2 years, risk of revision within 5 years, and the risk of dying within 90 days after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). We hypothesized that increasing BMI would increase these risks. Patients and methods - We analyzed a cohort of 83,146 patients who had undergone an elective THA for primary osteoarthritis between 2008 and 2015 from the Sw...
Source: Acta Orthopaedica - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: Acta Orthop Source Type: research
The global obesity epidemic continues apace and thus far efforts to reverse this are failing. The osteoarthritis (OA) community should be concerned as this is the leading modifiable risk factor for disease. Greater body mass index and obesity are associated with a heightened risk of hip and knee OA [1] with the obesity attributable risk for OA-indicated knee joint replacement an astounding 31% [2].
Source: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Obesity in the United States has reached epidemic proportions. It is associated with multiple higher rates of osteoarthritis of the hip and knee and thus an increasing need for total hip and knee arthroplasty. The demand for total joint arthroplasty among obese patients has increased and outpaces that of a non-obese cohort. The complications associated with obese patients undergoing hip or knee replacement is well defined in the literature.
Source: The Journal of Arthroplasty - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: 2018 AAHKS Annual Meeting Symposium Source Type: research
Obesity in the United States has reached epidemic proportions. It is associated with multiple higher rates of osteoarthritis of the hip and knee and thus an increasing need for total hip and knee arthroplasty. The demand for total joint arthroplasty among obese patients has increased and outpaces that of a non-obese cohort. The complications associated with obese patients undergoing hip or knee replacement is well defined in the literature.
Source: The Journal of Arthroplasty - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: 2018 AAHKS Annual Meeting Symposium Source Type: research
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