Unsatisfying antiviral therapeutic effect in patients with mother-to-child transmissed chronic hepatitis B virus infection: a prospective multi-center clinical study.

CONCLUSION: Adult patients with MTCT were more prone to severe liver diseases, and the therapeutic efficacy was relatively poor, which underlined the importance of earlier, long-term treatment and interrupting perinatal transmission. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01962155; https://clinicaltrials.gov. PMID: 31725459 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Chinese Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Chin Med J (Engl) Source Type: research

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Abstract HBV is the most common etiology of both liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in Korea. Despite much progress made, the currently available antiviral therapies cannot eradicate or eliminate this virus. Hence, the benefits and risks of antiviral therapy should be carefully evaluated on an individual basis and within the context of the clinical situation. The ultimate goals of treatment are to decrease the mortality from liver disease. The benefits of antiviral therapy come from prevention of progression of liver disease. Understanding the natural history of chronic HBV infection is a key step in the...
Source: Korean J Gastroenter... - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Korean J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Authors: Tao Y, Wu D, Zhou L, Chen E, Liu C, Tang X, Jiang W, Han N, Li H, Tang H Abstract Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) remains the leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality across the world. If left untreated, approximately one-third of these patients will progress to severe end-stage liver diseases including liver failure, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). High level of serum HBV DNA is strongly associated with the development of liver failure, cirrhosis, and HCC. Therefore, antiviral therapy is crucial for the clinical management of CHB. Current antiviral drugs including nucleoside/nucleot...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Authors: Wang J, Huang H, Liu Y, Chen R, Yan Y, Shi S, Xi J, Zou J, Yu G, Feng X, Lu F Abstract Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains to be a serious threat to public health and is associated with many liver diseases including chronic hepatitis B (CHB), liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although nucleos(t)ide analogues (NA) and pegylated interferon-α (Peg-IFNα) have been confirmed to be efficient in inhibiting HBV replication, it is difficult to eradicate HBV and achieve the clinical cure of CHB. Therefore, long-term therapy has been recommended to CHB treatment under the curren...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
In conclusion, in contrast to previous observations that tumor HBx variants lack transcriptional activity, we showed here that HBx variants have retained their ability to counteract Smc5/6 and thus to activate cccDNA transcription although they tend to lose antiproliferative activity.
Source: Antiviral Therapy - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Abstract Immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of a wide range of cancer types, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Workup and management of immune-mediated hepatitis, pancreatitis, or cholangitis that develops during immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment can be challenging. Immune-mediated hepatitis can be particularly challenging if patients have underlying viral hepatitis or autoimmune hepatitis. Patients with positive hepatitis B virus DNA should be referred to a hepatologist for antiviral therapy prior to immune checkpoint inhibitor ...
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Oncologist Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe purpose of this review is to discuss current and new knowledge regarding liver disease in pregnancy and pregnancy post-liver transplantation.Recent FindingsSevere liver disease associated with pregnancy is rare. Liver biopsy is rarely needed for diagnosis but is safe in selected cases. Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) with serum bile acids level>  40 μmol/L is associated with adverse fetal outcomes. Ursodeoxycholic acid should be initiated at diagnosis. Portal hypertension can worsen during pregnancy and screening endoscopy should be performed in the 2nd trimester. ...
Source: Current Gastroenterology Reports - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Conclusions: RDW is significantly increased in HBeAg+ CHB patients and patients with HBV-related hepatocirrhosis and could reflect their severity. RDW could help to distinguish hepatocirrhosis from CHB patients and inactive HBV carriers. PMID: 31217740 [PubMed - in process]
Source: International Journal of Medical Sciences - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Int J Med Sci Source Type: research
ConclusionsAn inverse association between CBI and NAFLD reciprocally existed in pediatric population. In longitude study, HBsAg loss was associated with NAFLD at week 96 of antiviral therapy.
Source: Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is the common chronic viral infection worldwide, affecting approximately 350million people. [1] Because persistently high hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication is associated with an increased risk of compensated cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), [2,3] replication-suppressing antiviral therapy is administered to CHB patients to prevent liver disease progression.[4] As a matter of fact, oral antiviral agents, particularly entecavir (ETV), reduce the risk of long-term complications such as liver compensated cirrhosis and HCC, ultimately improving survivals compared to controls.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is the most common chronic viral infection worldwide, affecting approximately 350 million people.1 Because persistently high hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication is associated with an increased risk of compensated cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC),2,3 replication-suppressing antiviral therapy is administered to patients with CHB to prevent liver-disease progression.4 As a matter of fact, oral antiviral agents, particularly entecavir (ETV), reduce the risk of long-term complications such as cirrhosis and HCC, ultimately improving survival compared to controls.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
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