Aging and Neuroinflammatory Disorders: New Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets.

Aging and Neuroinflammatory Disorders: New Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets. Curr Pharm Des. 2019 Nov 11;: Authors: Gambino CM, Sasso BL, Bivona G, Agnello L, Ciaccio M Abstract Chronic neuroinflammation is a common feature of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in various neurodegenerative age-associated disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and dementia. In particular, persistent low-grade inflammation may disrupt the brain endothelial barrier and cause a significant increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines and immune cells into the cerebral tissue that, in turn, leads to microglia dysfunction and lose of neuroprotective properties. Nowadays, growing evidence highlights a strong association between persistent peripheral inflammation, as well as metabolic alterations, and neurodegenerative disorder susceptibility. The identification of common pathways involved into the development of these diseases, which modulate the signalling and immune response, is an important goal of ongoing research. The aim of this review is to elucidate which inflammation-related molecules are robustly associated with the risk of neurodegenerative diseases. Of note, peripheral biomarkers may represent direct measures of pathophysiologic processes common of aging and neuroinflammatory processes. In addition, molecular changes associated with neurodegenerative process might be present many decades before the disease onset. Therefore, the ...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research

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Source: Techniques in Orthopaedics - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Symposium Source Type: research
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Alzheimer's Disease Dementia Source Type: news
In this study, analysis of antioxidant defense was performed on the blood samples from 184 "aged" individuals aged 65-90+ years, and compared to the blood samples of 37 individuals just about at the beginning of aging, aged 55-59 years. Statistically significant decreases of Zn,Cu-superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were observed in elderly people in comparison with the control group. Moreover, an inverse correlation between the activities of SOD-1, CAT, and GSH-Px and the age of the examined persons was found. No age-related changes in glutathione reductas...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
AbstractThe genetic variant rs72824905-G (minor allele) in thePLCG2 gene was previously associated with a reduced Alzheimer ’s disease risk (AD). The role ofPLCG2 in immune system signaling suggests it may also protect against other neurodegenerative diseases and possibly associates with longevity. We studied the effect of the rs72824905-G on seven neurodegenerative diseases and longevity, using 53,627 patients, 3,516 long-lived individuals and 149,290 study-matched controls. We replicated the association of rs72824905-G with reduced AD risk and we found an association with reduced risk of dementia with Lewy bodies (...
Source: Acta Neuropathologica - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This popular science article discusses at length the chronic inflammation that is characteristic of the old, and its role as a proximate cause of age-related disease. Inflammation is a necessary part of the immune response to injury and pathogens, and when present in the short term it is vital to the proper operation of bodily systems. But when the immune system runs awry in later life, and inflammatory processes are constantly running, then this inflammation corrodes metabolism, tissue function, and health. The causes of excess, constant inflammation are both internal and external to the immune system. Internally, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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