Genes, Vol. 10, Pages 928: Cdx2 Animal Models Reveal Developmental Origins of Cancers

Genes, Vol. 10, Pages 928: Cdx2 Animal Models Reveal Developmental Origins of Cancers Genes doi: 10.3390/genes10110928 Authors: Kallayanee Chawengsaksophak The Cdx2 homeobox gene is important in assigning positional identity during the finely orchestrated process of embryogenesis. In adults, regenerative responses to tissues damage can require a replay of these same developmental pathways. Errors in reassigning positional identity during regeneration can cause metaplasias—normal tissue arising in an abnormal location—and this in turn, is a well-recognized cancer risk factor. In animal models, a gain of Cdx2 function can elicit a posterior shift in tissue identity, modeling intestinal-type metaplasias of the esophagus (Barrett’s esophagus) and stomach. Conversely, loss of Cdx2 function can elicit an anterior shift in tissue identity, inducing serrated-type lesions expressing gastric markers in the colon. These metaplasias are major risk factors for the later development of esophageal, stomach and colon cancer. Leukemia, another cancer in which Cdx2 is ectopically expressed, may have mechanistic parallels with epithelial cancers in terms of stress-induced reprogramming. This review will address how animal models have refined our understanding of the role of Cdx2 in these common human cancers.
Source: Genes - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research

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Source: Biosensors and Bioelectronics - Category: Biotechnology Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Molecular Structure - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Molecular Structure - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
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Source: Chemico Biological Interactions - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
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Source: Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical - Category: Chemistry Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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