What Causes Gastroesophageal Reflux Following Sleeve Gastrectomy?

Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research

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ConclusionsRYGB is an effective therapy for patients with BE and reflux after SG. Its outcomes in the current study were BE remission in the majority of cases as well as a decrease in reflux activity. Further studies with larger cohorts are necessary to confirm these findings.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
We describe this unusual case which was treated effectively with ARMS. PMID: 31791169 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Scand J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
ConclusionOAGB is more effective for %EWL and dyslipidemia remission than SG. In addition, OAGB may lower the risk of postoperative leak, gastroesophageal reflux disease, revision, and mortality. Further comparisons of the clinical outcomes of OAGB versus SG for morbid obesity would benefit from more high-quality controlled studies.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
AbstractIntroductionSleeve gastrectomy (SG) has overtaken Roux-En-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) as the most common bariatric procedure worldwide. However, there is little long-term data comparing the two procedures.ObjectivesWe perform a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing 5-year outcomes of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing RYGB and SG.MethodsMedline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and NHS Evidence were searched for English language RCTs comparing RYGB with SG and assessed weight loss and/or comorbidity resolution at 5 years.ResultsFive studies were included in the final analysis. Meta-analysis demonstrates...
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
AbstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between bariatric surgery (laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy [LSG] and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [LRYGB]) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The number of obese patients with newly onset, worsened, or improved GERD after bariatric surgery in each article were extracted. In the pooled analysis, LSG was associated with a higher risk of GERD than LRYGB (odds ratio [OR] = 5.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.60 –7.23,p
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
AbstractIntroductionBariatric surgery is increasingly performed. Since there are numerous surgical techniques, the effects of these on the esophageal function are still poorly understood. We aimed at assessing the effect of different techniques on esophagogastric junction (EGJ), esophageal peristalsis and reflux exposure using high-resolution manometry (HRM), and impedance-pH monitoring (MII-pH).MethodsAll obese patients underwent symptomatic questionnaires, endoscopy, HRM, and MII-pH before and 1  year after surgery. Esophageal function and EGJ were classified according to Chicago Classification V. 3.0. Intragastric ...
Source: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has a reported incidence of between 10% and 20% in Western populations with an even higher incidence in populations with obesity [1]. The vast majority of patients are managed medically with surgical intervention undertaken in those with recalcitrant GERD. Populations with obesity and recalcitrant GERD who are interested in weight loss surgery have historically undergone laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). De Goot et  al. [2], in their 2009 meta-analysis, demonstrated improvement in GERD in people with obesity after LRYGB.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Video case report Source Type: research
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has a reported incidence of between 10 to 20% in western populations with an even higher incidence in populations with obesity (1). The vast majority of patients are managed medically with surgical intervention undertaken in those with recalcitrant GERD. Populations with obesity and recalcitrant GERD who are interested in weight loss surgery have historically undergone Laparoscopic Roux En Y Gastric Bypass (LRYGB). De Goot et al in their 2009 meta-analysis demonstrated improvement in GERD in people with obesity following LRYGB(2).
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionEE is more prevalent after SG compared with RYGB in a pre-bariatric surgery cohort with GERD. SG is associated with significant esophageal physiologic changes conducive to GERD and its clinical consequences.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionsPatients submitted to LSG showed a significant and progressive increase in the presence of “de novo” GERD. Also, an increased duodenogastric reflux was seen through an open and immobile pylorus. Therefore, based on these results, it seems like LSG is a “pro-reflux” surgical procedure, which should be continuously evaluated late after surgery.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
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