Preventing Toxicity in Renal Cancer Patients Treated With Immunotherapy Using Fecal Microbiota Transplantation

Condition:   Renal Cell Carcinoma Intervention:   Drug: Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Sponsors:   Lawson Health Research Institute;   Academic Medical Organization of Southwestern Ontario Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials

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Condition:   Renal Cell Carcinoma Intervention:   Drug: Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Sponsors:   Lawson Health Research Institute;   Academic Medical Organization of Southwestern Ontario Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
ConclusionsTo our knowledge, this is the first report of non-invasive detection of PD-L1 in renal cancer using molecular imaging. This study supports clinical evaluation of iPET to identify RCC patients with tumors deploying the PD-L1 checkpoint pathway who may be most likely to benefit from PD-1/PD-L1 disrupting drugs.
Source: Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Discussion MDSCs violently emerge in pathological conditions in an attempt to limit potentially harmful immune and inflammatory responses. Mechanisms supporting their expansion and survival are deeply investigated in cancer, in the perspective to reactivate specific antitumor responses and prevent their contribution to disease evolution. These findings will likely contribute to improve the targeting of MDSCs in anticancer immunotherapies, either alone or in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors. New evidence indicates that the expansion of myeloid cell differentiation in pathology is subject to fine-tuning, as its...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Hui Zhou, Xiaoyan Fu, Qian Li and Ting Niu* Department of Hematology and Research Laboratory of Hematology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China Background: Immune checkpoint inhibition therapy with monoclonal antibody against programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), including nivolumab and pembrolizumab, has demonstrated powerful clinical efficacy in the treatment of advanced cancers. However, there is no evidence-based systematic review on the safety and efficacy of anti-PD-1 antibody in treating lymphoma. Methods: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of nivolumab/pembrolizumab, we analyzed clin...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
This study included 18 buffy coats collected from volunteer blood donors admitted to the blood transfusion service of IRCCS Bambino Gesù Pediatric Hospital after obtaining informed consent. The Ethical Committee of IRCCS Bambino Gesù Pediatric Hospital approved the study (825/2014) and conducted in accordance with the ethical principles stated in the Declaration of Helsinki. Cells Lines and Cell Culture NK-92 (malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma), K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia, CD19−), Jurkat (acute T cell leukemia, CD19−) Karpas 299 (Human Non-Hodgkin's Ki-positive Large Cell ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In this study, several biopsies from a patient-derived primary renal-cell carcinoma were analyzed by whole-exome sequencing and aligned to healthy tissue. Next to several shared mutations between different subclones, ca. 23% of the mutations were only found in specific regions of the tumor. Strikingly, a single biopsy of that same tumor only covered around 55% of the total mutational diversity, underlining the need for multi-region sampling. Tracing the order of mutations in different subclones revealed that they develop in a branching fashion from the primary tumor clone, harboring the driver mutation, rather than in a li...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In this study, T cells deficient in TRAF6 display enhanced T cell activation, CD28-indpendent stimulation and resistance to Treg cell-mediated suppression (176). Although TLR signaling can promote T cell resistance to Treg cells, the precise molecular mechanism remains yet to be elucidated. It is worth noting that TLR stimulation of T cells increases cytokine production (173, 177), thus future studies should delineate the effect of TLR-MyD88 signaling vs. subsequently induced cytokines in generating resistance to Treg cells. Lastly, it is also crucial to evaluate the effect of TLR signaling on regulatory T cells which also...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions: CAR T cell therapies have demonstrated the clinical benefits of harnessing our body's own defenses to combat tumor cells. Similar research is being conducted on lesser known modifications and gene-modified immune cells, which we highlight in this review. Introduction Chimeric antigen receptors and engineered T cell receptors (based on previously identified high affinity T cell receptors) function by redirecting T cells to a predefined tumor-specific (or tumor-associated) target. Most of these modifications use retroviral or lentiviral vectors to integrate the construct, and most of the receptors ...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe role of the microbiome in genitourinary cancer is an emerging field that merits further studies. Translating microbiome research into clinical action will require incorporation of microbiome surveillance into ongoing and future clinical trials as well as expansion of studies to include metagenomic sequencing and metabolomics.Patient summaryThis review covers recent evidence that microbial populations that reside in the genitourinary tract—and were previously not known to exist—may influence the development of genitourinary malignancies including bladder, kidney, and prostate cancers. Furthermore,...
Source: European Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Conclusion This early-stage study gives us some insights into factors that might influence people's responses to a specific type of cancer treatment (immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies). The findings are of interest, but don't have any immediate implications for cancer treatment. We don't know what the conditions that required antibiotic treatment were and whether these could have affected the response to immunotherapy. We don't know whether the antibiotics themselves influenced how well the immunotherapy worked, or whether it was their effect on gut bacteria. We also don't know whether having high levels of part...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news
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