98 Percent Of Toddlers Eat Too Much Added Sugar, Report Finds

By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — A new analysis of national data published Wednesday finds 98% of toddlers and two-thirds of infants consume added sugars in their diets each day. The American Heart Association recommends children less than two years of age not have access to any added sugars, which includes any sweeteners that don’t naturally occur in food. “The consumption of added sugars among children has been associated with negative health conditions such as cavities, asthma, obesity, elevated blood pressure, and altered lipid profiles,” said lead investigator Kirsten Herrick, a program director at the Division of Cancer Control and Population Studies with the National Cancer Institute, a part of the National Institutes of Health. “Whether these associations exist for even younger children hasn’t been studied,” she added. “The aim of this study was to focus on one aspect of diet — added sugars [and] consumption among US infants and toddlers — that could inform the dietary guidelines.” Infants aged 6 to 11 months were typically given added sugars via flavored yogurt, baby snacks and sweet bakery products; the study did not count any sugars that are contained in breast milk or infant formulas. For toddlers aged 12 to 23 months, fruit drinks, candy and sweet baked goods were the primary source of the added sugars. “We did not find any differences in added sugar consumption by sex, family income level...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Parenting Source Type: news

Related Links:

Condition:   Malignant Neoplasm Interventions:   Drug: Fentanyl Sublingual Spray;   Drug: Morphine;   Other: Physical Performance Testing;   Other: Placebo;   Other: Quality-of-Life Assessment;   Other: Questionnaire Administration Sponsors:   M.D. Anderson Cancer Center;   National Cancer Institute (NCI) Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conditions:   D011471;   D064129;   D035683;   D009360;   D014408 Intervention:   Diagnostic Test: Periodic ARV7 and miRNA evaluation Sponsor:   Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Condition:   Locally Advanced Colon Cancer Intervention:   Combination Product: CAPECITABINE AND OXALIPLATIN Sponsor:   Universidad de León Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
It’s hardly news that the gastrointestinal tract is important to human health: It transports food from the mouth to the stomach, converts it into absorbable nutrients and stored energy, and shuttles waste back out of the body. If you don’t properly nourish yourself, you don’t live. It’s that simple. But in recent years, scientists have discovered that the GI system has an even bigger, more complex job than previously appreciated. It’s been linked to numerous aspects of health that have seemingly nothing to do with digestion, from immunity to emotional stress to chronic illnesses, including can...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
The Growing Toll of Our Ever-Expanding WaistlinesBy  JANE E. BRODY NOV. 13, 2017Paul Rogers I hope you ’re not chomping on a bagel or, worse, a doughnut while you read about what is probably the most serious public health irony of the last half century in this country: As one major killer — smoking — declined, another rose precipitously to take its place: obesity.Many cancer deaths were averted after millions quit lighting up, but they are now rising because even greater numbers are unable to keep their waistlines in check.Today, obesity and smoking remain the two leading causes of pre...
Source: Dr Portnay - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: To address the many challenges posed by EDCs, we argue that Africans should take the lead in prioritization and evaluation of environmental hazards, including EDCs. We recommend the institution of education and training programs for chemical users, adoption of the precautionary principle, establishment of biomonitoring programs, and funding of community-based epidemiology and wildlife research programs led and funded by African institutes and private companies. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1774 Received: 16 February 2017 Revised: 22 May 2017 Accepted: 24 May 2017 Published: 22 August 2017 Address correspond...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
Recent advances in molecular and imaging technologies, “omics” fields, and data sciences are offering researchers an unprecedented look at the placenta, the master regulator of the fetal environment.© EPA/National Geographic Channel/Alamy Studies of infants conceived during the Dutch “Hunger Winter” provided some of the earliest clues that prenatal stress could affect health much later in life.© Nationaal Archief  © Evan Oto/Science Source In one study, the placental microbiome had a similar taxonomic profile as the oral...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Featured Focus News July 2016 Source Type: research
When I started practicing medicine, I made a discovery that changed my view of the world forever. It was something few understood at the time. I’m talking about an “alien molecule” that gets into your blood and reprograms your cells to become more “feminine.” When this happens to women, it throws off their natural cycles, makes them gain weight, and pushes them emotionally into a very anxious and frustrated state. For men, this “invader” makes them soft, fat, depressed, and unable to perform. When I first started testing for this back in the 1990s, other physicians thought I was of...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Air BPA breathing lungs toxins Source Type: news
(Photo: © Job Boot) One nerve connects your vital organs, sensing and shaping your health. If we learn to control it, the future of medicine will be electric.When Maria Vrind, a former gymnast from Volendam in the Netherlands, found that the only way she could put her socks on in the morning was to lie on her back with her feet in the air, she had to accept that things had reached a crisis point. “I had become so stiff I couldn’t stand up,” she says. “It was a great shock because I’m such an active person.”It was 1993. Vrind was in her late 40s and working two jobs, athletics coa...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Academies | Asthma | Babies | Babies Heart Conditions | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cardiology | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) | Children | Diets | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Education | Fruit | Health | Heart | Milk | National Institutes of Health (NIH) | Nutrition | Obesity | Parenting | Sports Medicine | Study | Sugar | Sweeteners | Universities & Medical Training