AHA News: Omega-3 May Boost Brain Health in People With a Common Heart Disease

Title: AHA News: Omega-3 May Boost Brain Health in People With a Common Heart DiseaseCategory: Health NewsCreated: 11/12/2019 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/13/2019 12:00:00 AM
Source: MedicineNet Alzheimer - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: news

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This study, for the first time, shows that transplantation of non-autologous mitochondria from healthy skeletal muscle cells into normal cardiomyocytes leads to short-term improvement of bioenergetics indicating "supercharged" state. However, over time these improved effects disappear, which suggests transplantation of mitochondria may have a potential application in settings where there is an acute stress. Outlining Some of the Science Behind Partial Reprogramming at Turn.bio https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/03/outlining-some-of-the-science-behind-partial-reprogramming-at-turn-bio/ Tur...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
A brief look at the most recent death statistics from the CDC tells us that 74% of the deaths in the US are due to 10 causes: heart disease, cancer, injuries, chronic lower respiratory disease, stroke and cerebrovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, influenza and pneumonia, kidney disease, and suicide.1 So it comes as no surprise that many of us, as health care providers, are often consumed with treating disease, rescuing a patient from the jaws of death, and improving the quality of life for those who are afflicted by multiple comorbidities.
Source: Heart and Lung - Category: Intensive Care Authors: Source Type: research
We report a new class of natural-product-inspired covalent inhibitors of telomerase that target the catalytic active site. Age-Related Epigenetic Changes that Suppress Mitochondrial Function https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/03/age-related-epigenetic-changes-that-suppress-mitochondrial-function/ Today's open access research reports on two specific epigenetic changes observed in old individuals that act to reduce mitochondrial function. This joins an existing list of genes for which expression changes are known to impact mitochondrial function with age. A herd of hundreds of mitochondria are found ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
You may have already heard the term “insulin resistance,” as it has been widely discussed by doctors and the media. But did you know that you can reduce or reverse it in the vast majority of people? Insulin resistance, i.e., the inability of the body’s cells, especially liver, muscle, and brain, to respond to insulin and allow blood sugar to enter cells, drives numerous abnormal health conditions including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, fatty liver, Alzheimer’s dementia, and cancer. It is therefore a driving force behind so many modern and common chronic health conditions. Yo...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Open can belly fat can insulin resistance be reversed lose weight reduce belly fat reverse inflammation visceral fat wheat belly Source Type: blogs
This article describes the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including incidence and prevalence, mortality and morbidity, use and costs of care, and the overall impact on caregivers and society. The Special Report discusses the future challenges of meeting care demands for the growing number of people living with Alzheimer's dementia in the United States with a particular emphasis on primary care. By mid-century, the number of Americans age 65 and older with Alzheimer's dementia may grow to 13.8 million. This represents a steep increase from the estimated 5.8 million Americans age 65 and older who have Alzh...
Source: The Journal of Alzheimers Association - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimers Dement Source Type: research
In this study, we intravenously administrated the young mitochondria into aged mice to evaluate whether energy production increase in aged tissues or age-related behaviors improved after the mitochondrial transplantation. The results showed that heterozygous mitochondrial DNA of both aged and young mouse coexisted in tissues of aged mice after mitochondrial administration, and meanwhile, ATP content in tissues increased while reactive oxygen species (ROS) level reduced. Besides, the mitotherapy significantly improved cognitive and motor performance of aged mice. Our study, at the first report in aged animals, not only prov...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, the recently demonstrated protective effects of NMN treatment on neurovascular function can be attributed to multifaceted sirtuin-mediated anti-aging changes in the neurovascular transcriptome. Our present findings taken together with the results of recent studies using mitochondria-targeted interventions suggest that mitochondrial rejuvenation is a critical mechanism to restore neurovascular health and improve cerebral blood flow in aging. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling as a Point of Intervention to Spur Greater Neural Regeneration https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/02/wnt-%ce%b2-catenin-sig...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Why a d-β-hydroxybutyrate monoester? Biochem Soc Trans. 2020 Feb 25;: Authors: Soto-Mota A, Norwitz NG, Clarke K Abstract Much of the world's prominent and burdensome chronic diseases, such as diabetes, Alzheimer's, and heart disease, are caused by impaired metabolism. By acting as both an efficient fuel and a powerful signalling molecule, the natural ketone body, d-β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), may help circumvent the metabolic malfunctions that aggravate some diseases. Historically, dietary interventions that elevate βHB production by the liver, such as high-fat diets and partial star...
Source: Biochemical Society Transactions - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Biochem Soc Trans Source Type: research
(Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute) Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys and Harvard University have discovered that mitochondria trigger senescence, the sleep-like state of aged cells, through communication with the cell's nucleus--and identified an FDA-approved drug that helped suppress the damaging effects of the condition in cells and mice. The discovery, published in Genes&Development, could lead to treatments that promote healthy aging or prevent age-associated diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer's disease, heart disease and more.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Discussion of the Evolutionary Genetics of Aging Thymic Involution Contributes to Immunosenescence and Inflammaging The Potential for Exosome Therapies to Treat Sarcopenia Correlations of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Epigenetic Age Measures Evidence for PASK Deficiency to Reduce the Impact of Aging in Mice The Aging Retina, a Mirror of the Aging Brain Evidence for Loss of Capillary Density to be Important in Heart Disease Aspects of Immune System Aging Proceed More Rapidly in Men Deacetylation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome as a Way to Control Chronic Inflammation Transplantation of Senescent Cells is an ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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