Intraosseous venous malformation of the craniofacial region: diagnosis and management

We report eight cases of intraosseous venous malformation that were inappropriately labelled as haemangioma by clinicians, pathologists, and radiologists. We highlight tailored management, and describe the clinical features, results of investigations to aid accurate designation (histological and immunohistochemical, including GLUT1 staining and cross-sectional imaging), and outcomes.
Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research

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Intraosseous hemangioma (IH) in the maxillofacial area is a very uncommon neoplasm. Here, the authors show an exceptional case not previously reported in the literature of a 65-year-old man who presented with a pathological mandibular fracture following a facial trauma that was the first sign of an occult cavernous IH. Complete excision of the tumor in the mandibular ramus reduced the risk of severe bleeding and prevented long-term recurrence, whereas immobilization of the fracture obtained an excellent functional result. This clinical report highlights the possibility that a previously unknown primary IH may debut as a pa...
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Brief Clinical Studies Source Type: research
We report a case of a stridulous 2-month old female infant with mediastinal and subglottic hemangioma. The child was treated with propranolol without the need for tracheostomy or any other surgical intervention, and with no reported side effects. Propranolol is an effective, non-invasive treatment for life threatening infantile hemangiomas compressing the airway, should be used as a firstline treatment for subglottic hemangiomas when intervention is required.
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Brief Clinical Studies Source Type: research
ConclusionChronic radiodermatitis and osteoradionecrosis in adults, occurring as late complications, are uncommon, but can be observed even nearly 80 years after radiation. Large defects of the skull require a complete reconstruction to avoid several complications.
Source: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
Hemangiomas are benign vascular soft tissue tumors, which most frequently occur in the skin or subcutaneous tissue. Intramuscular hemangiomas typically occur in the trunk and extremities and less frequently in the head and neck. Among these, those occurring in the temporalis muscle are extremely rare. The authors report the case of a 43-year-old Japanese male with a mass in his left temporal fossa. Computed tomography images showed no erosion of the zygomatic bone, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed an ovoid well-marginated mass within the temporal muscle. The lesion was surgically excised with an endoscopy procedure ...
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Clinical Studies Source Type: research
In conclusion, surgery with skin flap elevation was concluded to be the best approach based on overall assessment of technical considerations, complications, and the cosmetic outcome. However, the surgeon should not hesitate to perform direct incisional biopsy when malignancy needs to be excluded.
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Brief Clinical Studies Source Type: research
Adult laryngeal hemangiomas are uncommon and often poorly symptomatic. The authors describe a laryngeal hemangioma with acute airway obstruction and radiologic findings suggesting a chondrosarcoma-like neoplasm, while pathologic features were consistent with an ossified hemangioma. The presence of fields of bone metaplasia into a classical cavernous hemangioma is an unusual phenomenon which, to our knowledge, was never previously described in the larynx. Difficulties concerning the differential diagnosis and modality of treatment are also discussed.
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Brief Clinical Studies Source Type: research
An epithelioid hemangioma is a very rare lesion arising from vascular structures. We encountered 2 cases in atypical locations, one in the orbital and the other in the nasal region. We performed preoperative angiography in addition to the diagnostic imaging recommended in the literature. Angiography highlighted the lesions well, and in one case, it was possible to embolize the arterial trunk of a high-flow lesion. Angiography underscored how such lesions may differ from the vascular perspective, emphasizing the importance of histology in correct diagnosis. Management of both hemangiomas yielded good functional and cosmetic...
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Brief Clinical Studies Source Type: research
Cavernous hemangioma (CH) is the most common benign tumor of the orbit which can expand the bony orbit by gradual growth of a large tumor. In this article, the authors report a 28-year-old man presented with a longstanding unilateral proptosis secondary to a huge orbital CH which also caused optic disc deformation and bone erosions in the adjacent orbital walls. The optic disc deformities resolved after the tumor removal.
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Brief Clinical Studies Source Type: research
In this study, the authors chose individual treatment for different patients. From January 2012 to December 2016, 185 patients with hemangioma were enrolled into this study. Lesion area ranged from 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm to 9 cm × 12 cm. The initial treatment age ranged from 1 to 7 months with an average age of 3.9 months. Thirty-five children achieved the treatment of Intralesional Compound Betamethasone, 134 children achieved the treatment of oral propranolol, and 16 children achieved the treatment of topical carteolol. In the follow-up, the treatment could be repeated or switched to oral propranolol...
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Clinical Studies Source Type: research
Conclusions: Although a rare entity, it is important to consider congenital calvarial hemangioma in the differential diagnosis of slow growing skull lesions due to the possibility of complications as a result of the hemangioma's intracranial extension, and the potential for treatment. En bloc resection has classically been described as a treatment for such lesions, although our case demonstrates that medical treatment with propranolol therapy may be appropriate in certain situations.
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Clinical Studies Source Type: research
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