Some Considerations in Treating Malignant Head and Neck Paragangliomas

To the Editor As academic physicians with an interest in pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma, we read with great interest the article by McCrary et al characterizing malignant head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs). The authors used the paraganglioma cohort from an academic tertiary cancer center diagnosed between 1963 and 2018. They found that the prevalence of malignant HNPGLs was 6 of 70 (9%), with 5 of 6 patients carrying the succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) mutation. They suggested that patients with paragangliomas should undergo genetic testing, and owing to the difficulty in diagnosing malignant HNPGL prior to surgery, selective neck dissection should be performed during an initial resection. The data presented here are informative, and we congratulate the authors on this effort, yet we have a few concerns.
Source: JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 13 December 2019Source: Academic RadiologyAuthor(s): Farideh Mohtasham, Jamal Rahmani, Yousef Khani, Siamak Sabour
Source: Academic Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
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Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Recent advances in molecular studies, especially genome-wide analyses, have revealed the landscape of genomic alterations present in endometrial carcinomas, and have provided valuable insight into the pathogenesis of this disease. The current challenges are in developing a molecular-morphologic classification system to enhance traditional pathologic diagnosis and in determining the optimal approach to using this new information to guide clinical management. Molecular assays may be particularly beneficial in allowing the earlier detection of endometrial cancer or precursor lesions and in guiding personalized treatment appro...
Source: International Journal of Gynecological Pathology - Category: Pathology Tags: PATHOLOGY OF THE CORPUS: REVIEW ARTICLE Source Type: research
acute; R, Faggiano A, Schlumberger M, Borson-Chazot F, Mannelli M, Gimenez-Roqueplo AP, Caron P, Timmers HJLM, Fassnacht M, Robledo M, Borget I, Baudin E, European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors (ENS@T) Abstract Background: Malignant pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (MPP) are characterized by prognostic heterogeneity. Our objective was to look for prognostic parameters of overall survival in MPP patients. Patients and Methods: Retrospective multicentric study of MPP characterized by a neck-thoraco-abdomino-pelvic CT or MRI at the time of malignancy diagnosis in European centers between 1998 and 201...
Source: Clinical Lung Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: J Clin Endocrinol Metab Source Type: research
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Source: Endocrine Pathology - Category: Pathology Source Type: research
This study included allSDHB mutation carriers who were followed at the Department of Endocrinology at the University Medical Center of Groningen. Kaplan –Meier curves were used to assess the penetrance. Poisson process was used to assess the optimal age to start surveillance and intervals. Ninety-oneSDHB-mutation carriers (38 men and 53 women) were included. Twenty-seven mutation carriers (30  %) had manifestations, with an overall penetrance 35 % at the age of 60 years. We calculated that optimal surveillance for HNPGL could start from an age of 27 years with an interval of 3.2 years. This s...
Source: Familial Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions We recommend prioritising testing for germline mutations in patients with HN-PGLs and T-PGLs, and for somatic mutations in those with PCC. Biochemical secretion and SDHB-immunohistochemistry should guide genetic screening in abdominal-PGLs. Paediatric and metastatic cases should not be excluded from somatic screening.
Source: Journal of Medical Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Editor's choice, Genetic screening / counselling, Epidemiology Cancer genetics Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers of Hormone Research - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Front Horm Res Source Type: research
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Source: Kidney Cancer Association - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news
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