Regular use of prescription drugs for pain and sleep increases frailty risk by 95 percent

(Oregon Research Institute) Regular use of prescription drugs for pain and sleep increases frailty risk by 95 percent among older adults. The possible implications of these research findings are especially serious given that it is common for older Americans to use two or more prescription drugs at the same time and many of these prescription drugs are for pain and sleep, including analgesics and sedatives.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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Originally described to be involved in feeding regulation, orexins/hypocretins are now also considered as major regulatory actors of numerous biological processes, such as pain, sleep, cardiovascular function, neuroendocrine regulation, and energy expenditure. Therefore, they constitute one of the most pleiotropic families of hypothalamic neuropeptides. Although their orexigenic effect is well documented, orexins/hypocretins also exert central effects on energy expenditure, notably on the brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis. A better comprehension of the underlying mechanisms and potential interactions with other hypo...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Insomnia and co-existing sleeplessness and musculoskeletal pain were inversely related to long-term recovery from chronic low back pain, a study found; relieving sleep problems may improve recovery.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape FamilyMedicine Headlines - Category: Primary Care Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news
The objective of this study was to evaluate if a single session of real or placebo cupping therapy in patients with chronic low back pain would be enough to temporarily reduce pain intensity and functional disability, enhancing their mechanical threshold and reducing local skin temperature. The outcome measures pain intensity using Brief Pain Inventory, pressure pain threshold, disability using the Roland Morris disability questionnaire, and low back skin temperature were assessed. This is an experimental clinical trial; after examination (AV0), patients were submitted to real or placebo cupping therapy (15 minutes, b...
Source: Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
This article explores five powerful ways that parents, caregivers and teachers can help young people discover the means to bounce themselves out of an automated self-scare routine and develop a personalised set of conscious self-care practices.  1. Get creative. Establishing habits is something that humans are very good at. Indeed, our lives can be conceptualised as the sum of the habits we have; these determine our actions as we move through the day, and in turn, how we make ourselves feel. The good news is that it only takes four weeks to establish a new habit, particularly with daily repetition. Guided to add ha...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: family featured health and fitness psychology self improvement kids mantra meditation Source Type: blogs
Millions of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) — from veterans to rape survivors — have new hope because of a watershed study showing that the injection of an anesthetic to a bundle of nerves in the neck can relieve their symptoms in a clinically significant way. The treatment is known as the stellate ganglion block, or SGB. Used since 1925 for problems such as pain in the arm and shingles, it is safe and effective. In the newly released, eight-week, U.S. Army-funded clinical trial of 108 active-duty service members with PTSD, the nonprofit research institute RTI International found that patients...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Personal PTSD Research Treatment Hyper Vigilance Neuroscience Neurotransmitter Norepinephrine Posttraumatic Stress Disorder pruning Source Type: blogs
Study Design. This is an observational cohort study. Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of PT to an interdisciplinary treatment approach in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Summary of Background Data. CLBP is a costly and potentially disabling condition. Physical therapy (PT), cognitive behavioral therapy, and interdisciplinary pain programs (IPPs) are superior to usual care. Empirical evidence is lacking to clearly support one treatment approach over another in patients with CLBP. Methods. One hundred seventeen adult patients who completed an IPP for individuals with &g...
Source: Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH Source Type: research
Authors: Johnson KA, Gordon CJ, Grunstein RR Abstract BACKGROUND: Previous studies examining insomnia in populations with traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not distinguished between transient insomnia symptoms and insomnia disorder and associations have been confounded by other highly prevalent sleep disorders post-TBI. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the associations between affective symptoms and somatoform symptoms in patients with TBI and insomnia, sleep apnoea and hypersomnolence. METHODS: Twenty-four participants from a multidisciplinary brain injury rehabilitation service with TBI were assessed for insomni...
Source: NeuroRehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: NeuroRehabilitation Source Type: research
We all love and look forward to the holidays, but even good things can be stressful.  Listen in as our guest, PsychCentral.com’s founder, Dr. John Grohol, tells us how to avoid overindulging this year, how to handle the extra work burdens of the season, and how to deal with that annoying relative. SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW Guest information for ‘Holiday Coping’ Podcast Episode John M. Grohol, Psy.D. is a pioneer in online mental health and psychology. Recognizing the educational and social potential of the Internet in 1995, Dr. Grohol has transformed the way people could access mental health and psyc...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Family General Holiday Coping Interview LifeHelper Podcast Relationships Stress The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Expressive suppression, pain interference, and non-restorative sleep share some overlap with one another and with depression, but nonetheless have an additive negative effect on EF performance beyond depression. Quantifying these transient contextual factors may improve the accuracy of EF assessment and, by extension, the utility of EF measures in predicting daily functioning. These transient contextual factors also represent targets that, if better managed, may reduce EF lapses in daily life. PMID: 31805814 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Clinical Neuropsychologist - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Clin Neuropsychol Source Type: research
Conclusion of this paper: Fever is a great risk factor for arrhythmia events in Brugada Syndrome patients. Patients with known fever-triggered Brugada syndrome should be surveilled closely during fever and be started on antipyretic therapy as soon as possible.  There are limited data regarding the impact of EP study in BrS patients triggered by fever.  An EP study might be helpful in symptomatic patients (Sroubek et al., 2016) in the presence of spontaneous BrS ECG or drug-induced ECG.The prognostic significance of fever-induced Brugada syndrome.  Heart Rhythm 2016.Eighty-eight asymptomatic patient...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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